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Thousands declare support for Kremlin critic in Russia's March election

But 41 year old lawyer Alexei Navalny has been deemed ineligible to run in the Russian election due to a criminal conviction.

Russia Election Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's supporters gathered in St Petersburg today. Source: PA Images

MORE THAN 15,000 Russians have endorsed the candidacy of Alexei Navalny, seen as the only Russian opposition leader who stands a fighting chance of challenging President Vladimir Putin in a March vote.

“An election without us is not an election,” Navalny declared in Moscow around 6pm Irish time, before submitting his nomination to the Central Electoral Commission, which will rule whether he can run.

Authorities have deemed the 41-year-old ineligible to run due to a criminal conviction, saying “only a miracle” would help him get registered. Navalny has described the conviction as politically motivated.

Russia Navalny The 41-year-old anti-corruption crusader has run a yearlong grassroots campaign to force the Kremlin to let him run. Source: Alexander Zemlianichenko

Thousands backing the charismatic lawyer met in 20 cities from the Pacific port of Vladivostok to Saint Petersburg in the northwest to nominate him as a candidate in the presence of electoral officials to boost his chances of contesting the March 18 ballot.

His campaign said more than 15,000 people endorsed him nationwide. An independent candidate needs 500 votes to get registered with election authorities, according to leglisation.

In Moscow, more than 700 people supported Navalny’s candidacy as they gathered in a huge marquee set up in a picturesque park on the snow-covered banks of the Moscow River.

“I am hugely happy, I am proud to tell you that I stand here as a candidate of the entire Russia,” the Western-educated Navalny told supporters earlier.

“We are ready to win and we will win these elections,” Navalny said before finishing his speech in a cloud of confetti.

Russia Election Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny giving a speech earlier today. Source: AP/PA Images

‘Thwart dishonest elections’

Navalny said that if he is not allowed to put his name on the ballot he will contest the ban in courts and repeated his threat to call for the polls to be boycotted if he did not get registered.

“Thwart the elections if they are dishonest,” he told supporters.

Putin, aged 65, announced this month that he will seek a fourth presidential term, which would extend his rule until 2024 and make him the longest-serving Russian leader since dictator Joseph Stalin.

Opposed by token opposition candidates, he is widely expected to sail to victory.

Russia Putin Russian President Vladimir Putin arrives to attend a meeting of the Presidential Council for Culture and Art in the Kremlin. Source: Maxim Shipenkov

But with the result of the March vote a foregone conclusion, turnout could be low, harming Putin’s hopes for a clear new mandate, observers say.

Navalny, who has tapped into the anger of a younger generation who yearn for change, hopes that popular support for his Kremlin bid would pressure authorities into putting his name on the ballot.

“If Navalny is not allowed to run, I am not going to vote,” pensioner Marina Kurbatskaya told AFP in Moscow. “I don’t see anyone else who I want to become president.”

Navalny has built a robust protest movement in the face of persistent harassment and jumped through multiple hoops as he campaigned across the country in an effort to shift attitudes amid widespread political ennui.

He says he is the only Russian politician who has run a genuine Western-style political campaign, stumping for votes in far-flung regions.

Russia Election Navalny speaks to the media earlier today. Source: Ivan Sekretarev

Many critics scoff at Navalny’s Kremlin bid but the anti-corruption blogger says he would beat Putin in a free election if he had access to state-controlled television, the main source of news for a majority of Russians.

‘Need new president’

Navalny shot to prominence as an organiser of huge anti-Putin rallies that shook Russia in 2011 and 2012 following claims of vote-rigging in parliamentary polls.

The rallies gradually died down but he has been able to breathe new life into the protest movement this year, bringing out tens of thousands of mostly young protesters onto the streets.

“We need a new president,” Alexander Semyonov, 18, told AFP in Saint Petersburg, where more than 1,800 supporters backed Navalny’s bid.

Separately, Ilya Yashin, a pro-opposition municipal deputy, gathered several hundred people for an unauthorised protest in central Moscow in support of free elections and Navalny’s bid.

“Putin is a thief,” some chanted as police looked on.

Despite a litany of problems such as corruption, poor healthcare and increasing poverty, opinion polls suggest Putin enjoys approval ratings of 80%.

Asked why Navalny had been barred from running, Putin – who has refused to mention him by name in public — said the opposition was hoping for a “coup” but would not succeed.

© AFP 2017

Read: Putin announces he will seek new term as Russia president

Watch: Boris Johnson just had a very tense press conference with his Russian counterpart

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