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How Noteworthy is tackling inequity by giving a platform to unheard voices

Social justice has been a focus of investigative platform Noteworthy since its inception over three years ago.

Noteworthy - Explore the stories that matter to you...

“GIVING A voice to a minority group within society, this is a textbook example of why this… is important.”

Noteworthy was proud that this aspect of our report on Travellers in the justice system was highlighted by judges when it won a Human Rights/Social Justice Reporting Justice Media Award.

Social justice is the principle that all members of society have equal rights and opportunities.

Highlighting inequity and giving a voice to those not traditionally heard in Irish media or politics has been a focus of Noteworthy since its inception over three years ago.

This is largely because our team sources its ideas for investigations, from you our supporters, and then puts them out for crowdfunding. This enables us to focus on issues that may not normally grab the spotlight from the daily news cycle. 

In addition to our TOUGH START investigation which exposed the gargantuan challenges faced by children from the Traveller community, we have published key projects including: 

  • SPEAK OR SURVIVE where reporter Peter McGuire exposed how sexual violence victims were still fighting roadblocks to justice 
  • DELAYED DELIVERY where Orla Dwyer alongside the Noteworthy team recently showed that children are still left waiting for public disability services 
  • REAPING THE HARVEST where investigative reporter Niall Sargent teamed up with the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network to explore concerning conditions for seasonal employees in the horticulture sector

For these projects, we ensure they are approached and framed through the prism of the people who are directly impacted by them. Getting this right often involves extensive background work and research, including focus groups. 

Our work in this area has had wide-reaching impacts including being raised in the Oireachtas by politicians as well as being highlighted and used by advocate groups. 

Fisher on vessel wearing protective clothes and gloves holding a net, with a catch of Dublin Bay prawns in the background.

Our team continues to listen to you on what we should investigate and there are currently a number of projects open for crowdfunding related to social justice. 

Migrant workers are often exploited and we want to examine the poor conditions faced by them in the Irish fishing industry through HANDS ON DECK

Au pairs, meat factory workers and those in the gig economy are also at risk and our NO KIDDING, MAKE ENDS MEAT and APP LIFE projects hope to expose issues in these sectors. 

A major problem encountered by those trying to advocate for their rights is access to a language interpreter. Without this, many may find their voices continue to go unheard. Our proposed project LOST FOR WORDS hopes to investigate this further. 

Design for NO ROOM - Wheelchair user shaking hands with business person who is handing them keys to a house.

Other members of society at risk from inequity include disabled people and older people.

There is a crisis within a crisis for disabled people who are left homeless or in unsuitable accommodation and our NO ROOM project will investigate just how difficult it is for disabled people to secure a home. 

Insufficient support by the State for particular vulnerable groups is something that our reporters often come across during investigations. NEXT OF KIN will find out if the State is failing to support older people providing full time care for their grandkids.

With your support, Noteworthy will continue to give a platform to the unheard voices in our society. Thank you for helping us do this! 

About the author:

Maria Delaney

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