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The Statue of Liberty went dark for several hours last night

A spokesperson for the National Park Service said that the outage probably was related to a project for a new emergency backup generator.

Statue of Liberty Lights Source: AP Photo

FOR SEVERAL HOURS last night, Lady Liberty didn’t shine so brightly.

The famed Statue of Liberty was temporarily in the dark after what a spokesman calls an “unplanned outage”.

The 46 metre-high colossal copper statue was plunged into darkness except for its crown and torch, which continued to glow faintly.

WCBS-TV says the statue was dark except for the crown and torch. The lights returned shortly before midnight.

The outage sparked conversation on Twitter in the US that perhaps it was done deliberately for today’s A Day Without Women protest being held in the country.

Women in the US have been advised not to work in order to highlight social, economic, cultural and political contributions made by women.

Tweet by @Women's March Source: Women's March/Twitter

Tweet by @Tabby Biddle Source: Tabby Biddle/Twitter

Today also marks International Women’s Day across the world.

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However, a spokesperson for the National Park Service said that the outage probably was related to a project for a new emergency backup generator in the area.

He said the official cause will be determined later today when crews return to work on the project.

The Statue of Liberty is situated on Liberty Island in the Upper New York Bay of the Hudson River.

It was gifted by the France to the US in 1886.

With reporting from AP

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About the author:

Cormac Fitzgerald

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