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Galway City Council ask for mural they commissioned to be removed

Two months ago, council officials commissioned and paid for a mural at a derelict drapery shop on William Street, seeking permission from the landlords to paint it.

The short-lived, offending mural.
The short-lived, offending mural.
Image: Maria McHale/Twitter

GALWAY CITY COUNCIL have reportedly taken down a mural two months after commissioning it.

Two months ago, council officials commissioned and paid for a mural at a derelict drapery shop on William Street, seeking permission from the landlords to paint it.

Last week, the planning department issued a legal notice to remove it. The decision has been heavily criticised on social media.

“It doesn’t really blend in with the rest of the street, doesn’t suit the town, it’s all pinks and purples,” a local merchant told TheJournal.ie.

Galway’s an historic city with some nice medieval buildings. The mural was an eyesore, it wasn’t really of anything. It was a disaster.

The owners of the former drapery shop were approached by Galway City Council for permission to erect a mural before the 2020 European City of Culture judges arrived.

Mural The controversial mural on the dilapidated former Taaffe's premises on William Street. Source: Connacht Tribune

Enforcement notice

Last week, they were served with an enforcement notice by the planning unit to remove it, accusing them of painting the street art without permission, the Connacht Tribune reported.

A spokesman for the landlord of Taaffe’s, formerly owned by Una Taaffe told the Connacht Tribune they were contacted in early July about the ugly facade of the iconic building on William Street.

“[Galway City Arts Officer] James Harrold made a verbal request to do up the front of Taaffes as the judges would be walking up and down the street,” the spokesman said.

He said they wanted to paint a mural in-keeping with the theme of the Galway 2020 bid, Making Waves.I gave permission for it and that was the last I heard about it.

The landlord said he would obey the warning letter rather than risk prosecution.

“We will do our civic duty as we are told and paint over the artwork. I don’t know what colour to pick now. Do we go fuchsia?”

Efforts to contact Galway City Council was unsuccessful tonight.

Earlier this summer, Claddagh Jewellers on Shop Street in Galway City were forced to take down a mural of a beanstalk featuring Claddagh rings, after it was judged to have been painted without planning permission.

Claddagh mural Source: Ruairi O'Byrne

Read: Police officer from Dublin attacked with a meat cleaver in New York

Read:  Starbucks open another store without planning permission, and the local council isn’t happy

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