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'Accounting error' caused Irish Uber customers to be charged for journeys they didn't take

Some users were charged up to €70 after they failed to flag a taxi using the app.

Image: Shutterstock/Tero Vesalainen

TAXI SERVICE UBER has told Irish customers that it is attempting to resolve an issue that saw a number of individuals charged for journeys they didn’t take earlier this month.

The National Transport Authority contacted the company after a number of customers complained that they had been charged up to €70 after failed attempts to use the app to call a taxi.

A number of customers reported earlier this month that they were charged after an Uber driver apparently accepted a job but did not show up.

However, it appears that the problem arose following a fault with Uber’s accounting system and, when contacted by the NTA, the company’s senior management confirmed that the problem had been identified and addressed.

There is no suggestion that customers were being overcharged by drivers.

A spokesman for the NTA said that the authority has been monitoring the situation and has referred complainants to Uber, adding that the company has refunded affected customers.

“NTA is scheduled to meet with Uber management soon to review their approach to dealing with this matter with particular reference to their obligation as a Taxi Dispatch Operator to have “a consumer complaints procedure to effectively address any complaints received…”,” the spokesman added.

In a statement, an Uber spokeswoman said affected customers would be reimbursed in full.

The spokeswoman added: “We are working hard to resolve this issue and are also in touch with the National Transport Authority.”

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