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The latest update to Vine may cause you to start using it again

The app will now allow users to upload and edit videos directly, making it easier to put together clips. Here’s what you need to know.

Image: TheJournal.ie

IF YOU USE Vine regularly, or you’re aware of it, you may have heard of the latest iOS update which was announced last night and arrived this morning (an update for Android will be arriving soon).

While there are a number of updates included such as improvements to navigation and sharing, the most exciting feature is the option to upload videos directly from your camera roll onto Vine.

Essentially, you can splice together videos or trim longer videos so they fit the six seconds or less requirement. Before that, you would have to either hope you got the shots right, which can be a case of trial and error if you’re not savvy with video, or use third-party apps to upload edited videos.

Vine Update Source: TheJournal.ie

For example, the Vine below was originally 12 seconds, but through the editing features, we cut it down to two main clips, the first one removed the start where very little happened while the second left out a section where the screen’s brightness began adjusting automatically (As you may have noticed, this is a very basic example so forgive us for the less than perfect camera work).
http://vine.co/v/MLAVU0vQ5jr

How it works is pretty simple. When you boot up the camera, there’s an upload symbol located on the left-hand site. Tapping that will bring up every video that you’ve uploaded in which you select the one you want.

Vine upload Source: TheJournal.ie

The video is automatically selected to play the first six seconds of the video, but you can either reduce the length of the selected clip or scroll right to left to select a different part of the video.

Vine edit 1 Source: TheJournal.ie

When you’re finished and looking at the preview of the new clip, you can edit it further by reducing the size of a clip, in case one doesn’t fit in properly. You can also duplicate a selected clip or turn off sound for it entirely.

Vine edit 2 Source: TheJournal.ie

What that means for you is that sharing videos on Twitter is going to be much easier than before. As mentioned earlier, one of the barriers to Vine is that it required people to record in the moment, and if you didn’t get the shot right, recreating it was a pain even with the drafts function.

Also, since the most popular Vines tend to be edited in some form so really this is Vine giving more leeway so people spend more time on the app itself.

On the Vine blog, the team’s iOS engineer Richard Plom, said that more than 100 million people watch Vines across the web, and there are one billion loops every day, suggesting that even if you’re not using it on Twitter, there’s still potential for it to be viewed elsewhere.

Introducing video uploading might not solve the problem entirely, but it should make it easier for casual users to get to grips with.

Read: Is disappearing news the next step for Snapchat? >

Read: Turns out people are downloading fewer smartphone apps than before >

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About the author:

Quinton O'Reilly

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