Readers like you keep news free for everyone.

More than 5,000 readers have already pitched in to keep free access to The Journal.

For the price of one cup of coffee each week you can help keep paywalls away.

Support us today
Not now
Advertisement

What location is featured in the earliest depiction of an Irish city?

The original version of this charter (pictured) dates from 1372 – but what city does it represent, and who is pictured in it?

The Waterford Charter of 1372, as reproduced for a new book Cois tSiúire
The Waterford Charter of 1372, as reproduced for a new book Cois tSiúire
Image: Rubicon Heritage Services

WHAT IS THE location featured in the earliest depiction of an Irish city?

It’s Waterford, and the depiction can be seen in the new book Cois tSiúire: 9000 years of Human Settlement in the Lower Suir Valley, published by the National Roads Authority.

The book tells the story of the archaeological landscape around Waterford and as part of the work for it, Rubicon Heritage Services excavated a number of sites in Ireland.

It also standardised all the archaeological graphics for the book including the Waterford Charter, which dates to 1372 and is housed in the Waterford Museum of Treasures.

It was originally drawn up in a bid to confirm charter status from King Edward III (who is pictured at the top of the roll receiving the key of the city) and is a unique document.

Rubicon reproduced the Waterford Charter after comparing it with a 19th century Du Noyer’s sketch.

After the final layout was agreed on and all features of the map had been sketched in, the image was worked up digitally in a style aimed to mimic, rather than replicate, the Charter scene.

Cois tSiúire: 9000 years of Human Settlement in the Lower Suir Valley is available now from major bookshops and throughout the Waterford region.

Read: Archaeologists find new Viking site at Temple Bar>

Read next:

COMMENTS (26)