This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 14 °C Tuesday 15 October, 2019
Advertisement

Irish women are pretty concerned about discrimination at work. Irish men? Not that bothered.

Many women don’t believe they’re being rewarded as much as their (equally qualified) male colleagues.

Robin Wright as Clare Underwood in 'House of Cards' - a woman who battles to forge her own reputation on the political stage, in the shadow of her more powerful husband.
Robin Wright as Clare Underwood in 'House of Cards' - a woman who battles to forge her own reputation on the political stage, in the shadow of her more powerful husband.
Image: House of Cards/Netflix

ARE WOMEN STILL playing second-fiddle to their male counterparts in the workplace, in terms of pay and conditions?

Depends who you ask, really.

According to a large-scale survey released today, 53 per cent of women in Ireland think that equally capable (an important phrase here) male and female colleagues aren’t being rewarded or paid in an equal manner.

Just 16 per cent of men hold similar views.

Similarly, 54 per cent of women believe the same career opportunities are available to both sexes. Only 22 per cent of men say they hold the same view.

More than 600 professionals in Ireland responded to the survey, carried out on behalf of recruiters Hays.

It was part of larger, international survey involving 6,000 people.

Looking at the global results – just 18 per cent of men, compared to 45 per cent of women, said they didn’t believe the genders were rewarded or paid equally.

The survey shows – according to Hays Ireland Director Maureen Lynch – that most people in executive and senior management roles (the majority of whom are men) “still fail to see any inequality when it comes to pay and career opportunities between the sexes”.

This lack of recognition is a real obstacle to change.

Today marks International Women’s Day, which has been celebrated for over 100 years and is used to highlight issues affecting women in particular around the world.

Read: University ordered to pay €70k to lecturer passed over for promotion

Read: Men get paid 21% more than women in the private sector

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

About the author:

Read next:

COMMENTS (65)