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Dublin: -2°C Monday 17 January 2022
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The 5 at 5: Monday

5 minutes, 5 stories, 5 o’clock.

Image: Christopher Sessums via Flickr/Creative Commons

EVERY WEEKDAY EVENING, TheJournal.ie brings you the five stories you should know before you head out the door for the day.

1. #BAILOUT: The European Commission has dismissed a report that said the troika is considering making changes to Ireland’s bailout loans, saying that it is “simply not true”. A spokesperson for economics commissioner Olli Rehn said that there are no plans to extend the repayment schedule for Ireland’s bailout loans.

2. #MISSING PERSON: Polish police are searching for a 21-year-old Irish football fan who has been missing in Poland since Saturday afternoon. James Nolan from Wicklow was last seen at around 1pm in Bydgoszcz, around 130 kilometres north east of Poznan, where Ireland is to play Italy tonight.

3. #ASSK: Burmese campaigner and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi has arrived in Ireland this afternoon as part of her first trip to Europe in nearly 25 years. She was greeted at Dublin Airport by Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore, head of Amnesty Ireland Colm O’Gorman, and Bono. She is to be given the Freedom of Dublin city at an event in Grand Canal Square later this evening.

4. #ABUSE: A 66-year-old man who was once one of the most successful amateur boxing coaches in the country has been sentenced to eight years in jail for raping a teenage boy he trained. Frank Mulligan pleaded guilty to two counts of raping the 14-year-old boy, RTE reports. Mulligan is currently in prison for sexually abusing other boys.

5. #OUCH: A former lecturer of US president Barack Obama has said that his former student should not be re-elected as US President because his approach to solving the economic crisis has been ill-thought out. Brazilian Roberto Unger, who teaches at Harvard Law School, said Obama’s economic policies have been mostly based on “financial confidence and food stamps”.

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