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6.5 per cent increase in new car sales in January

New CSO figures show that the number of private cars registered in January 2012 was up by almost 900 on last year.

The number of new cars sold last month was 6.5 per cent higher than in January 2011, with Toyota the most popular brand.
The number of new cars sold last month was 6.5 per cent higher than in January 2011, with Toyota the most popular brand.
Image: Photocall Ireland

THE NUMBER OF new cars registered in the first month of 2012 was up by more than six per cent on the same period from last year, new figures have shown.

Data from the Central Statistics Office showed that 14,507 new private cars were registered in January 2012 – an increase of 883, or 6.5 per cent, on the 13,624 sold in the same month of last year.

Simultaneously, the number of new goods vehicles registered was up by 11.7 per cent – from 969 in January 2011 to 1,082 in the month just concluded. 2,624 used private cars were imported to Ireland from other jurisdictions.

Of the 14,507 new private licensed last month, the vast majority – almost 73 per cent – ran on diesel. 24 per cent are powered by petrol.

178 petrol-and-electric hybrids were sold, as were 297 cars running on petrol and alcohol, and seven fully electric vehicles.

Toyota was the most popular brand of car sold, accounting for 2,612 of the new cars sold as well as just under a tenth of all used imported cars.

Read: Drop ’13? from next year’s numberplates to save car industry, urges Healy-Rae

More: Cheaper cars may be on the way to Ireland after ECJ ruling

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Gavan Reilly

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