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The 9 at 9: Saturday

Here are the nine stories you need to know as you start your bank holiday weekend.

Image: Number 9 photo via Shutterstock

EVERY MORNING TheJournal.ie brings you the nine stories you need to know as you start your day.

1. #BAILOUT: Eurozone finance ministers have agreed on a bailout deal for Cyprus worth €10 billion in order to save the country from bankruptcy.

2. #LABOUR: Minister of State Jan O’Sullivan has said her former party colleague Róisín Shortall should not have resigned, calling it a “wrong decision on her part”.

3. #PROPERTY TAX: Just under 600 people have paid the property tax in its first week, according to new figures released by Revenue.

4. #ABDUCTION: Developer Kevin McKeever who was being questioned by Gardaí over his alleged kidnapping has been released without charge and the investigation has closed, RTE News reports.

5. #PENALTY POINTS: TD Joan Collins has said the controversy surround Luke ‘Ming’ Flanagan’s penalty points has impacted on the reputation of independent deputies in the Dáil.

6. #HACKING: Around 600 new allegations of phone hacking incidents at the now-closed News of the World newspaper have surfaced in an investigation by police in London, the Guardian reports.

7. #ROADS: A man in his early 20s has died in a single vehicle crash in Tipperary in the early hours of this morning.

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8. #MEN ONLY: The Irish Times reports that Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore cancelled a planned visit to Savannah in the US state of Georgia to avoid having to attend a men-only dinner, which is one of the main events of St Patrick’s Day in the city.

9. #TREASURE TROVE: The New York Times reports on an extraordinary collection of more than 100,000 artifacts and documents from Ireland’s history – including an original copy of the 1916 Easter Proclamation - amassed by a Mayo fish merchant over his lifetime. The collection is to go on permanent display in Mayo.

About the author:

Christine Bohan

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