Advertisement

We need your help now

Support from readers like you keeps The Journal open.

You are visiting us because we have something you value. Independent, unbiased news that tells the truth. Advertising revenue goes some way to support our mission, but this year it has not been enough.

If you've seen value in our reporting, please contribute what you can, so we can continue to produce accurate and meaningful journalism. For everyone who needs it.

Former Bolivian president Evo Morales Xinhua News Agency/PA Images
Evo Morales

Ex-Bolivian president travelling to Mexico after being granted asylum

This comes as his supporters and foes clashed on the streets of La Paz following his resignation.

FORMER BOLIVIAN PRESIDENT Evo Morales has said he was travelling to Mexico after being granted asylum there.

This comes as his supporters and foes clashed on the streets of La Paz following his resignation.

Morales stepped down on Sunday following weeks of massive protests over a disputed presidential election, but the resignations of every constitutionally designated successor left unclear who will take his place and how.

Angry supporters of the socialist leader set barricades ablaze to block some roads leading to the country’s main airport, while his foes blocked most of the streets leading to the capital’s main square in front of Congress and the presidential palace.

Police urged residents of La Paz to stay in their homes and said they were joining with the army to avoid an escalation of the violence.

Morales tweeted that he was leaving yesterday evening, and Mexico’s Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard confirmed in a tweet that the former leader was on a plane sent by Mexico City.

“I am leaving for Mexico, grateful for the openness of these brothers who offered us asylum to protect our life,” Morales tweeted.

“It hurts me to leave the country, for political reasons, but I will always be concerned. I will return soon, with more strength and energy.”

Amid the power vacuum, opposition politician and Senate second vice president Jeanine Anez said in an emotional address that she would take temporary control of the Senate, though it was unclear if she would be able to get approval from Congress, which is controlled by supporters of the ex-president.

Readers like you are keeping these stories free for everyone...
A mix of advertising and supporting contributions helps keep paywalls away from valuable information like this article. Over 5,000 readers like you have already stepped up and support us with a monthly payment or a once-off donation.

Your Voice
Readers Comments
35
This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
Leave a Comment
    Submit a report
    Please help us understand how this comment violates our community guidelines.
    Thank you for the feedback
    Your feedback has been sent to our team for review.

    Leave a commentcancel