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'Suicide is not fashion': Burberry apologises for creating hoodie with noose-shaped strings

The hoodie debuted during London Fashion Week.

A model wears a controversial hoodie by Burberry at the Autumn/Winter 2019 fashion week runway show in London
A model wears a controversial hoodie by Burberry at the Autumn/Winter 2019 fashion week runway show in London
Image: Vianney Le Caer/Associated Press

THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE and chief creative officer of Burberry have apologised after a hoodie with strings tied in the shape of a noose was shown on the company’s London Fashion Week runway.

The hoodie surfaced after Sunday’s show, when a model hired to walk along the runway, but not wear the outfit, complained both before the show and then on Instagram, saying the noose not only evoked lynchings but also suicide.

Marco Gobbetti, the brand’s CEO, said in a statement that Burberry was “deeply sorry for the distress” the top has caused and has removed it from the autumn-winter collection, along with all images featuring the look.

Riccardo Tisci, Burberry’s creative director, also apologised, saying “while the design was inspired by a nautical theme, I realize that it was insensitive”.

Model Liz Kennedy took to Instagram the day of the show, posting a photo of the hoodie with a long message directed at Burberry and Tisci.

“Suicide is not fashion,” she wrote.

“It is not glamorous nor edgy and since this show is dedicated to the youth expressing their voice, here I go.

“Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway.

“Let’s not forget about the horrifying history of lynching either.”

Her post has prompted dozens of negative social media comments directed at Burberry and Tisci.

The collection, called ‘Tempest’, is Tisci’s second for the brand.

The clothes were a mix of classic, severely tailored ensembles to more trendy street-inspired looks aimed at younger consumers.

Kennedy and other critics said the company should have known better.

“A massive brand like Burberry who is typically considered commercial and classy should not have overlooked such an obvious resemblance.

“I left my fitting extremely triggered after seeing this look. Feeling as though I was right back where I was when I was going through an experience with suicide in my family,” she wrote on Instagram.

She said she asked to speak to somebody about it and was told to write a letter.

“I had a brief conversation with someone but all that it entailed was ‘It’s fashion. Nobody cares about what’s going on in your personal life so just keep it to yourself.’”

The gaffe comes after Gucci removed a sweater from the market last week after complaints that the oversized collar designed to cover the face resembled blackface makeup.

In December, Prada stopped selling baubles that also prompted complaints of racist imagery.

Those two companies have announced initiatives to foster cultural diversity and awareness among their employees to avoid future missteps.

If you need to talk, support is available:

  • Samaritans 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.ie
  • Aware 1800 80 48 48 (depression, anxiety)
  • Pieta House 1800 247 247 or email mary@pieta.ie (suicide, self-harm)
  • Teen-Line Ireland 1800 833 634 (for ages 13 to 19)
  • Childline 1800 66 66 66 (for under 18s)

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Associated Press

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