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Dublin: 10 °C Saturday 6 June, 2020
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Clontarf water disruption: DCC says water can be boiled for use

In photos: Tankers supply water as testing continues in St Lawrence district metre area of north Dublin.

Local resident Rosemary McGinn collects water from a city council tanker on Castle Avenue yesterday.
Local resident Rosemary McGinn collects water from a city council tanker on Castle Avenue yesterday.
Image: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland

UP TO 1,400 HOUSEHOLDS in north Dublin are still affected by a water service disruption over contamination concerns.

Dublin City Council and the HSE have advised people in the affected area (from the Howth Road to Castle Avenue, and from the Howth Road at Collins Avenue to Clontarf Road) to avoid drinking their tapwater until bacterial tests show that the water is safe for consumption.

The latest test results have shown significant improvement in the water quality, according to the DCC, and all tests carried out to date have confirmed that there is no e-coli present in the samples tested. Tests have also shown that the issue is confined to the St Lawrence’s district metre area of Clontarf.

Clontarf water disruption: DCC says water can be boiled for use
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  • Clontarf

    City council crews on Castle Avenue providing an alternative supply of water to residence from those areas. (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)
  • Clontarf

    City council worker Gary Ward and local resident Jennifer Powell on Castle Avenue yesterday. (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)
  • Clontarf

    City council worker Gary Ward with the water tanker on Castle Avenue. (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)
  • Clontarf

    Water from the tankers must also be boiled before consumption (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)
  • Clontarf

    Residents of up to 1,400 premises in Clontarf are still being warned not to drink their tapwater after routine testing found contamination. (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)
  • Clontarf

    Two tankers are providing locals with an alternative water supply during the disruption to regular water services. (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)
  • Clontarf

    Local resident Rosemary McGinn collects water from a city council tanker. (Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland)

However, residents and businesses are now being advised that they can boil water for drinking or cooking while supplementary tests and system cleaning are being carried out. They also note that the water is safe for bathing and washing dishes and laundry.

Tankers will continue to provide water in the affected area of Clontarf and will be located at Castle Avenue (at Kincora Avenue) and at St Lawrence Road (at the Howth Road).

Further updates will be posted on the Dublin City Council website.

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