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The tragically powerful story behind the lone German who refused to give Hitler the Nazi salute

August Landmesser’s act of defiance stands out amid the throng of Nazi salutes at this 1936 rally.

12 Source: Wikipedia

ADOPTED BY THE Nazi Party in the 1930s, Hitler’s infamous ‘sieg heil’ (meaning ‘hail victory’) salute was mandatory for all German citizens as a demonstration of loyalty to the Führer, his party, and his nation.

August Landmesser, the lone German refusing to raise a stiff right arm amid Hitler’s presence at a 1936 rally, had been a loyal Nazi.

Landmesser joined the Nazi Party in 1931 and began to work his way up the ranks of what would become the only legal political affiliation in the country.

Two years later, Landmesser fell madly in love with Irma Eckler, a Jewish woman, and proposed marriage to her in 1935.

41 Irma Eckler Source: Unknown

After his engagement to a Jewish woman was discovered, Landmesser was expelled from the Nazi Party.

Landmesser and Eckler decided to file a marriage application in Hamburg, but the union was denied under the newly enacted Nuremberg Laws.

The couple welcomed their first daughter, Ingrid, in October 1935.

And then on June 13, 1936, Landmesser gave a crossed-arm stance during Hitler’s christening of a new German navy vessel.

The act of defiance stands out amid the throng of Nazi salutes.

21 Source: Wikipedia

In 1937, fed up, Landmesser attempted to flee Nazi Germany to Denmark with his family. But he was detained at the border and charged with ‘dishonouring the race’ or ‘racial infamy’ under the Nuremberg Laws.

A year later, Landmesser was acquitted for a lack of evidence and was instructed to not have a relationship with Eckler.

Refusing to abandon his wife, Landmesser ignored Nazi wishes and was arrested again in 1938 and sentenced to nearly three years in a concentration camp.

He would never see the woman he loved or his child again.

31 Source: Wikipedia

The secret state police also arrested Eckler, who was several months pregnant with the couple’s second daughter.

She gave birth to Irene in prison and was sent to an all-women’s concentration camp soon after her delivery.

Eckler is believed to have been transferred to what the Nazi’s called a “euthanasia centre” in 1942, where she was murdered with 14,000 others.

After his prison sentence, Landmesser worked a few jobs before he was drafted into war in 1944.

A few months later, he was declared missing in action in Croatia.

- Amanda Macias

Read: This huge Nazi flag caused consternation in Nice

Read: TV station uses Nazi Holocaust symbol in a story about Jewish holiday

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