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Google threatens to shut down Swiss Street View

Closing down the service in one whole country would be the internet giant’s biggest response yet to privacy violation claims.

The Google Street View Snow Mobile takes pictures of ski slopes for Google's Street View with the Matterhorn in the background.
The Google Street View Snow Mobile takes pictures of ski slopes for Google's Street View with the Matterhorn in the background.
Image: Olivier Maire/AP/Press Association Images

GOOGLE IS THREATENING to wipe photographs of streets and houses in Switzerland from its online maps unless the country’s supreme court overturns a ruling requiring an absolute guarantee of anonymity for people captured by the popular Street View service.

Shutting down Street View in an entire country would be the Internet search giant’s most extreme response yet to growing complaints it is violating people’s privacy.

Google said today it will ask the Swiss Federal Tribunal to throw out a lower court decision that obliged it to ensure all faces and vehicle license plates are blurred before uploading pictures to the Street View service. Street Views allows map users to click on virtually any spot in a city to zoom into a series street-level pictures taken by cars mounted with 360-degree cameras.

The ruling last month by the Federal Administrative Court in Bern – following a complaint from the country’s privacy watchdog – ordered Google to obscure identifying features such as skin color and clothing from people photographed in the vicinity of “sensitive establishments,” such as women’s shelters, retirement homes, prisons, schools, courts and hospitals.

If Google fails at the higher court and goes through with its threat, it would be the first time that the company has permanently switched off Street View anywhere in the world, though it has faced privacy concerns in many of the 27 countries where the service is available.

Last year, it bowed to demands for users in Germany to be able to blur entire houses in Street View. And in March the company received a €100,000 fine in France because the cars used to take photographs for Street View had illegally collected personal data from Wi-Fi networks, something it has apologised for.

Switzerland’s data protection commissioner, Hanspeter Thuer, had filed the complaint against Google after determining that the company’s automatic face blurring software wasn’t 100 percent accurate.

The company denied that it would be too expensive to manually check all Street View images, as Thuer had proposed. Instead, it argued that human being would likely make more mistakes than computers, which it said already have an accuracy rate of 99 percent.

But with some 212 million Street View images viewed in Switzerland since the launch of the service, the error margin runs in the millions.

During a court hearing in February, Thuer used a live version of Street View to demonstrate examples where the software failed to obscure faces of adults and children in public – including outside the court – and even inside private homes.

“We will try our very best to preserve Street View for Swiss users,” said Patrick Warnking, Google’s country manager for Switzerland.

- AP

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