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Irish Navy member commanding officer brought to court over duty-free cigarettes

The Irish Navy member said the reprimand he received should be quashed because it was imposed by an officer he claims played a role in the investigation

The LE James Joyce
The LE James Joyce
Image: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ie

A MEMBER OF the Irish Naval Service has launched a High Court action over being disciplined for bringing too many duty-free cigarettes on board the ship he was serving.

The action has been brought by Eugene O’Toole arising out of an incident that occurred last September when he was serving on board the LE James Joyce, which at the time was anchored at the port of Valetta in Malta.

OToole, from Mallow in Cork, claims the reprimand he received over the incident following a disciplinary process should be quashed because the sanction was imposed by his commanding officer who he claims played a role in the investigation of the allegation.

Counsel for O’Toole. Nathan Jones Bl, instructed by O’Regan Little Solicitors, told the High Court that O’Toole has been a member of the Defence Forces since 2002 and holds the rank of Leading Sick Berth Attendant with the Naval Service.

The incident occurred on 22 September when O’Toole brought a quantity of duty-free cigarettes on board the LE James Joyce.

The vessel had just completed a deployment in the Mediterranean when its crew rescued some 2,500 migrants.

The amount of cigarettes was in excess of the allowance permitted under the ship’s captain’s standing orders. However, O’Toole claims he had previously sought and had obtained permission to bring the cigarettes on board from a superior officer.

Later that day, while he was on duty, he was approached by his commanding officer Lt Commander Niall Manning who demanded to know why the cigarettes were being loaded onto the ship.

OToole said he believed he had permission to have the cigarettes brought on board.

Shortly afterwards, O’Toole said he was summoned to the cabin of the officer who had given him permission to bring the cigarettes on board.

That officer told O’Toole that the Commanding Officer had ordered that all the duty-free cigarettes were to be unloaded within 15 minutes or charges would be brought against O’Toole.

All of the cigarettes were unloaded.

Reprimand

Arising out of the incident three charges were brought against O’Toole over the cigarettes. The charges were considered By Lt Cmdr. Manning in April of this year.

Two of the charges were dismissed. However one charge, that O’Toole’s conduct was to the prejudice of good order and discipline contrary to section 168 of the 1954 Defence Act, was found proven by Lt Cmdr Manning.

O’Toole received a reprimand.

It is O’Toole’s case that Lt Cmdr Manning had a clear prior involvement in the matter and should not have been the person who considered the charges.

In the circumstances O’Toole claims he has been denied fair procedures and that Lt Cmdr Manning has acted unlawfully.

O Toole also argues that his constitutional rights have been breached.

In his action against the Minister for Defence, Ireland, the Attorney General and Lt Cmdr Manning O’Toole seeks orders quashing his commanding officer’s decision to find the charge proven.

He also seeks an order quashing the decision to reprimand him.

He further seeks a declaration the his commanding officer erred in law and acted outside his powers by investigating and then make a determination on the charges.

Permission to bring the challenge was granted on an ex-parte basis by Justice Margaret Heneghan.

The judge made the matter returnable to a date in October.

Comments are off as legal proceedings are ongoing.

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About the author:

Aodhan O Faolain

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