#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 1°C Sunday 27 September 2020
Advertisement

New road maintenance scheme asks local communities to contribute funding

The government is investing €10.6 million in the scheme but communities will have to come up with the rest of the €14 million to repair the roads.

Image: Ciaran Cronin

THE GOVERNMENT HAS announced the details of a €10.6 million works on local roads in a  pilot scheme that involves asking for funding contributions from communities in certain areas.

Making the announcement today, Minister of State Alan Kelly said the ‘Community Involvement Scheme’ (CIS) will see lesser rural roads now benefitting from ‘direct community input’.

Work will be undertaken at 377 locations and over 240km of roads will be improved under the new scheme. The voluntary scheme involves funding of €10.6 million to be provided by the government over two years in 2013 and 2014, though the total cost of the maintenance will be €14 million.

In order to come up with the rest of the money, local authorities have asked communities to contribute a proportion of the cost either through funding, labour provision, mahinery or other forms of benefit.

“This funding is then being added to my department’s spend to prioritise maintenance in rural isolated areas and will allow communities have a direct input along with their local authority into local road maintenance,” Kelly said today.

“In the normal course of a County Council’s road works programme, repairs to minor county roads would only be considered towards the end of the programme after more heavily trafficked routes had been dealt with and the purpose of this pilot community involvement scheme is to permit local participation in the repair of roads.”

Read: Varadkar urges local authorities to focus on road maintenance>
Read: Potholes, loose chippings, floods: Welcome to Ireland’s rural roads>

#Open journalism No news is bad news Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

Read next:

COMMENTS (163)