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Sunday 5 February 2023 Dublin: 2°C
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# Horsemeat
New test results show no trace of horse DNA in Liffey Meat products
A range of beef burgers sampled by the Department of Agriculture from products manufactured by Liffey Meats between 10 to 16 January 2013 have tested negative for equine DNA.

NEW LABORATORY TEST results have shown no presence of equine DNA in a range of beef burgers sampled by the Department of Agriculture from products manufactured by Liffey Meats between 10 to 16 January 2013.

The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Simon Coveney TD described the news as “very positive” as it supports the company’s claims of having addressed any concerns that arose from the findings of the FSAI survey in December, which found very low trace levels of equine DNA in three of the Liffey Meats burger samples.

Coveney referred to a statement from 19 January in which the FSAI stated: “where horse or pork meat is not used as an ingredient but is inadvertently or accidentally present at low levels, [it] would not be declared on the label”.

Meanwhile, investigations are continuing at “an intensive level” in relation to identifying the source of the equine DNA in the Silvercrest processing facility, he said.

Coveney said these investigations include further quantitative laboratory analysis of a range of samples of burgers and raw ingredients, a detailed analysis of records held by the company relating to the sourcing of ingredients, and the incorporation of these ingredients in the manufactured burgers that have tested positive for equine DNA.

He also noted the Silvercrest’s decision to temporarily close down the entire plant and to work with the Department and FSAI to complete their investigation.

Read: Goodman: Horse DNA tests could be contaminated ‘by the air’

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