#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 7°C Friday 4 December 2020
Advertisement

The 5 at 5: Monday

5 minutes, 5 stories, 5 o’clock…

Image: Leo Reynolds via Flickr

EACH WEEKDAY EVENING, TheJournal.ie brings you five things you should know before you head out the door for the evening…

1. #CENTRAL BANK: The Central Bank of Ireland has reported a profit of over €1 billion for 2011 in its annual report published today. Most of its profit came from commercial lending to individual banks and would have been higher were it not for a decision to set aside €300 million to cover any potential shortfall from its monetary policy operations.

2. #FACEBOOK: No sooner had Facebook floated on the stock market last week amid considerable hype then already shares in the social networking giant nosedived today. Shares fell by nearly 14 per cent this morning in early trading in New York as investors who acquired shares last Friday looked to offload them this week.

3. #MAHON: The final cost of the Mahon Tribunal, which spanned 13 years and thousands of pages in a report published earlier this year, will come in at just under €200 million – €196 million to be exact, according to the latest estimates from the Department of Environment. Outstanding legal costs will account for 60 per cent of this final figure.

4. #DEATH: An appeal has been issued for witnesses to an assault on Parnell Street in Dublin in the early hours of Sunday morning after a 51-year-old woman was found dead yesterday evening at a flat on Railway Street in Dublin 1. The incident occurred outside a fast food outlet when a woman, described as being in her 20s, got in an altercation with another 51-year-old woman just after 3am on Sunday morning.

5. #CATS AND DOGS: Authorities in Italy have got their tail between their legs after a proposal to introduce a tax on ownership of cats or dogs, or both, was scrapped on the very day that it was suggested. The proposed tax on ‘animals of affection’ was roundly criticised and labelled as “shameful” by some.

About the author:

Hugh O'Connell

Read next:

COMMENTS (6)