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Friday 3 February 2023 Dublin: 12°C
# Flight MH370
"Highly unlikely" surface wreckage from missing Malaysia plane will be found
It has been forty days since the search began in the remote ocean off the Western Australian coast.

AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER Tony Abbott has admitted it was “highly unlikely” that any surface wreckage will be found from Flight MH370 as he announced a more intensive underwater search.

Australia is coordinating the hunt for the missing Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 which disappeared on March 8 carrying 239 people and is believed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean.

Aircraft and ships have been scanning the surface of vast tracts of remote ocean off the western Australian coast for more than 40 days with no signs of wreckage from the plane.

UK sub ends missing plane hunt role Chris Ison Royal Navy submarine HMS Tireless which has concluded its contribution to the search for the black box of missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 Chris Ison

“I am now required to say to you that it is highly unlikely at this stage that we will find any aircraft debris on the ocean surface,” Abbott told reporters in Canberra.

“By this stage, 52 days into the search, most material would have become water logged and sunk,” he added.

“With the distances involved, all of the aircraft are operating at close to the limit of sensible and safe operation.”

Abbott said the search would now enter a new phase that would involve undersea efforts being ramped up, with authorities searching the ocean floor over a much larger area.

“Essentially though what we are looking to do is conduct as thorough an undersea search as is humanly possible,” Abbott said.

“If necessary, of the entire probable impact zone which is roughly 700 kilometres by 80 kilometres.”

The search area for MH370 has been defined by analysis of satellite data, and was boosted by several detections of transmissions believed to have come from the plane’s black box recorders before their batteries died.

China Malaysia Plane AP / Press Association Images A relative of Chinese passengers onboard the Malaysia Airlines MH370 speaks to media as he and others wait for Malaysia embassy staff to meet them outside the Malaysia embassy in Beijing AP / Press Association Images / Press Association Images

A submersible Bluefin-21 scouring a 400 square kilometre zone centred around one of these transmissions has so far failed to yield any results despite searching almost the entire area.

Abbott said the Bluefin-21 would continue its hunt, while Australia in consultation with the Malaysia government was willing to engage one or more commercial companies to undertake the extra work.

“While the search will be moving to a new phase in coming weeks, it certainly is not ending,” the prime minister said.

- © AFP, 2014

Read: Airline says ten staff members were held for hours by MH370 relatives>

Read: Angry scenes as relatives of MH370 passengers meet airline staff>

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