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Winners and losers of Budget 2012: In pictures

There was plenty at stake in the austere Budget presented by Brendan Howlin and Michael Noonan over the past two days. This slideshow will fill you in…

THERE ISN’T ONE person in Ireland who won’t see the effect of Budget 2012 on their pocket in the coming year, from VAT increases on everyday goods to the household charge, benefits cuts and indirect taxes.

But these groups are particularly going to be affected – for better or for worse…

Winners and losers of Budget 2012: In pictures
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  • Losing: Shoppers

    Minister Michael Noonan reckons the 2 per cent VAT increase on most consumer goods won't hit shopping expenditure here. Pic: Eamonn Farrell/Photocall Ireland.
  • Winning: Publicans

    Alcohol was not hit by an increase in excise duty - and the new year will see new legislation on the sale of cheap alcohol. Pic: James Horan/Photocall Ireland.
  • Losing: Young people with disabilities

    Rates of payment for new claimants aged 18 to 21 are being cut from €188 to €100 a week .The rate for new claimants aged 22 to 24 is being cut from €188 to €144 a week. File pic: Leon Farrell/Photocall Ireland.
  • Winning: Farmers

    Farmers were given some help in stamp duty reduction on transferring farmleand, on capital gains tax, on stock relief rate and VAT exemption on wind turbines. Pic: Eamonn Farrell/Photocall Ireland.
  • Losing: The third child

    Child benefit payment rates will fall for the third child and onwards in a family. Lone parents will also suffer cuts to payments. Pic: Kheel Center, Cornell University/Flickr.com
  • Winning: Patrick Nulty. Sort of.

    Labour TD Patrick Nulty, centre, won much popular support for saying he would vote against Budget 2012. He might lose the party whip for it though. Pic: Laura Hutton/Photocall Ireland.
  • Losing: Tax exiles

    Michael Noonan closed the loophole where so-called tax exiles could be domiciled in Ireland but escape €200k tax by renouncing Irish citizenship. Pic: Niall Carson/PA Wire.
  • Winning: The Irish Secret Service

    Yes it exists - and its €1m annual budget was left uncut. It only spent €450k of its allowance last year. Pic: Derek Hatfield/Flickr.com
  • Losing: Students

    An increase in the registration fee, education funding cuts and new financial barriers for postgrads were in Budget 2012. Pic: Julien Behal/PA Wire.
  • Winning: First-time buyers

    Mortgage interest relief will be boosted for first-time buyers - but they'll have to get in the market next year, Pic: Robert Lowe/Flickr.com
  • Losing: Home owners

    There are some exceptions to the €100 Household Charge - but many home owners will be hit with it in 2012. Pic: Clyde Robinson/Flickr.com
  • Winning: Low earners

    On one level at least - in terms of the Universal Social Charge - around 330,000 low earner will be exempt from paying the USC. Pic: Dan Moyle/Flickr.com
  • Losing: Widows

    The number of PRSI payments required to qualify for a widow's pension has been trebled. Pic: AP Photo/Paul White.
  • Losing: Motorists. (Not this one.)

    Increased motor tax and duties on diesel and petrol is going to make driving a more expensive occupation. Pic: Jeff Moore/Empics entertainment/PA Wire.
  • Losing: Those in need of healthcare

    The drugs payment scheme excess has been raised and private patients may find their healthcare premiums will increase because of new reforms in charges for public beds. Pic: Erich Ferdinand/Flickr.com
  • Losing: Community gardai

    There will be 31 additional Garda station closures in 2012, which the GRA has said will "change the genetic code of policing". Pic: Laura Hutton/Photocall Ireland.
  • Losing: Smokers

    A pack of 20 cigarettes will cost 25 cent extra. Pic: Machechyp/Flickr.com

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