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Dublin: 16 °C Thursday 22 August, 2019
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Diarmuid Martin expresses concern over 'anti-Islamic sentiments being expressed in social media in Ireland'

Martin said that some of this anti-Islamic sentiment came from publications “purporting to be of Catholic inspiration”.

File photo of Diarmuid Martin.
File photo of Diarmuid Martin.
Image: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ie

THE ARCHBISHOP OF Dublin Diarmuid Martin has expressed concern about anti-Islamic sentiments being expressed in social media in Ireland in the wake of the mass shooting at two mosques in New Zealand.

Martin said that some of this anti-Islamic sentiment came from publications “purporting to be of Catholic inspiration”.

At least 49 people were killed in today’s attack in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, at the Masjid Al Noor and Linwood mosques in the city, with many more injured. 

Police have arrested and charged a man with murder in relation to the attacks.  

Commenting on the attacks, Archbishop Diarmuid Martin has expressed his shock at the shootings.

He asked for prayers to be said at all Masses in the Archdiocese of Dublin on Sunday in remembrance of those who were killed or injured. 

Martin then expressed his concern about anti-Islamic sentiments being expressed in social media in Ireland.

Gardaí 

Following the attack, community gardaí are attending local mosques today to provide support to the country’s Muslim community.

An Garda Síochána today said it has a productive and positive relationship with the Muslim community in Ireland built up over many years.

As part of this and to provide support following the terrible events in New Zealand, community gardaí will be attending Friday prayer in their local mosque and making themselves available to those communities.

Speaking from the United States, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar also expressed Ireland’s condolences and solidarity with the people of New Zealand.

“New Zealand and its people are open, tolerant and welcoming,” Varadkar said in a statement.

We join them today, united in our condemnation of this appalling attack and determined in our resolve that hate will not triumph. 

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About the author:

Cormac Fitzgerald

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