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Dublin: 20 °C Tuesday 16 July, 2019

Yesterday’s News

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Wednesday 3 February, 2016

Fine Gael are using ghost estates on their posters, but little has been done to stop it happening again

Who was to blame for these eyesores, asks Frank Armstrong, part of the Nama to Nature campaign.

Monday 19 May, 2014

Opinion: How one country saw epidemic illnesses plummet – and Ireland could too

A dietary metamorphosis adopted in Finland in the 1970s has seen heart disease, some cancers and obesity levels drop dramatically. We should take note.

Sunday 7 April, 2013

How gastronomy can make us more conscious of the true value of food

The original 19th century gastronomy movement encouraged restraint and reflection – and should make us sensitive to “smart, site-specific” agriculture to address the issue of how to feed the world well.

Monday 10 September, 2012

Column: Smart farming needed for the future

Large-scale livestock farming is out of step with food-production needs and the effect of climate change, writes food writer and lecturer Frank Armstrong.

Sunday 29 July, 2012

Column: Make no mistake - it is time to make beef-eating taboo

Being a regular steak consumer should be considered more environmentally egregious than being an SUV driver, writes Frank Armstrong.

Sunday 18 December, 2011

Column: It’s time to take the turkey off the Christmas table

The modern turkey is an unfortunate abomination, reduced by genetic selection to a sedentary, corpulent creature that cannot naturally reproduce.

Saturday 3 December, 2011

Column: Applying the lessons of beating Big Tobacco to beating Big Food

An ‘obesity tax’ on its own is a regressive move – much more nuanced strategies are required to get people thinking about what they put in their bodies, says food writer Frank Armstrong.