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Dublin: 5 °C Monday 25 May, 2020
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Your evening longread: The strange world of the jungle prince of Delhi

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

Image: Shutterstock/Amit kg

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

For the next few weeks, we’ll be bringing you an evening longread to enjoy. With the news cycle dominated by the coronavirus situation, we know it can be hard to take your mind off what’s happening.

So we want to bring you an interesting read every weekday evening to help transport you somewhere else.

 We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

The jungle prince of Delhi

This fascinating and slightly bonkers story from last year is about the author Ellen Barry’s friendship with a man called Prince Cyrus, who claimed to be the heir to a Muslim kingdom called Oudh. But as she became obsessed with his story, things got weirder…

(The New York Times, approx 33 mins reading time)

I knew about the royal family of Oudh, of course. They were one of the city’s great mysteries. Their story was passed between tea sellers and rickshaw drivers and shopkeepers in Old Delhi: In a forest, they said, in a palace cut off from the city that surrounds it, lived a prince, a princess and a queen, said to be the last of a storied Shiite Muslim royal line. There were different versions, depending on whom you spoke to. Some people said the Oudh family had been there since the British had annexed their kingdom, in 1856, and that the forest had grown up around the palace, engulfing it. Some said they were a family of jinns, the supernatural beings of Arabian folklore.

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