This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 7 °C Sunday 19 January, 2020
Advertisement

Ireland 2019: Fewer spuds, more cows...more baby Theodores than you may have expected

The most popular first names remain Jack and Emily.

IRELAND HAS MORE Thedores, more rain and less potatoes, according to Ireland’s Facts and Figures publication from the Central Statistics Office. 

The latest figures show Ireland’s population stood at 4,921,500 in 2019. Females (2,483,500) outnumbered males (2,438,000) by 45,500.

The statistical snapshot also highlights gender inequality.

According to the CSO, just one in nine CEO’s of large businesses are women. Meanwhile, 93% of company Chairpersons were male and 7% female.

33% of people who experienced workplace discrimination cited gender – the most common ground identified.

The highest median wages were in Dublin. Males earned €717.67 a week compared to females who earned €573.

Capture Source: CSO

The CSO statistics shows that agriculture patterns are shifting. 

In 1859, 374,000 hectares were sown with potatoes. By 2018, the figure has reduced to just 8,000 hectares. 

Cattle numbers, meanwhile, have been rising. In 1848, there were 2.1 million cattle in Ireland. In 2018, cattle numbers stood at 7.35 million. 

In 1971, there was an average 912 millimetres of rain in Ireland. In 2018, there was 1,224 millimetres.

Capture Source: CSO

There were 2,326,000 people employed in Ireland with 128,000 people unemployed in the Third Quarter of last year. 

According to the CSO, Ireland’s top three surnames for babies were Murphy, Kelly and Ryan. 

The most popular first names are still Jack and Emily.

Frankie, Theodore and Freddie entered the Top 100 Baby Boys’ named in 2018. Bella, Ada, Bonnie and Ivy entered the Top 100 Baby Girls’ named in 2018. 

Capture Source: CSO

Meanwhile, there were 136,316 driving tests in 2018 with a 52.5% pass rate. 

Yet 15,523 people failed to show up for their appointment and 73,194 full licences were held by drivers over the age of 80.

The CSO statistics also highlight figures for marriages in Ireland. 

In 2018, there 21,053 marriages including 664 same-sex marriages – 372 male unions and 292 female unions.

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

About the author:

Read next:

COMMENTS (17)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel