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Protests erupt over Trump's Pittsburgh visit as funerals for synagogue victims begin

11 people were gunned down during prayers at the Tree of Life synagogue on Saturday.

Updated Oct 30th 2018, 10:29 PM

Shooting Synagogue Protesters demonstrate near Pittsburgh's Tree of Life Synagogue where President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump were visiting a memorial in Pittsburgh Source: Matt Rourke via PA Images

US PRESIDENT DONALD Trump has visited the Pittsburgh synagogue where 11 people were gunned down at the weekend in an anti-Semitic attack, as more than 1,000 protesters gathered nearby to make it clear the US president was unwelcome.

Carrying signs that read “President Hate, Leave Our State!” and “Trump, Renounce White Nationalism Now,” the protesters gathered near the Tree of Life synagogue where the carnage unfolded on Saturday.

Trump – accompanied by his wife Melania, as well as his daughter Ivanka and her husband Jared Kushner, who are Jewish – was to light a candle for each of the 11 victims, killed during Shabbat services.

The controversial visit came after mourners crowded into nearby synagogues and joined street processions at the first funerals for some of the victims of the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in modern US history.

The service for brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal, both in their 50s, was the first in honour of those killed in what was an apparent hate crime.

Services for 66-year-old doctor Jerry Rabinowitz and 71-year-old Daniel Stein followed in Pittsburgh, where scores of residents protested Trump’s visit.

The president’s trip to Pennsylvania came amid a mounting row over whether his fierce rhetoric at campaign rallies and on Twitter has helped stoke extremism ahead of next week’s midterm elections.

“It’s just enraging that this type of hate crime could occur here and that the leadership of our country does not denounce anti-Semitism and does not denounce white nationalism and does not denounce neo-Nazism. And that is the problem,” mourner Joanna Izenson told AFP.

News: Synagogue Shooting Pedestrians make their way past a collection of flowers placed for victims of the synagogue shooting along Shady Avenue in Pittsburgh Source: SIPA USA/PA Images

Suspect Robert Bowers is facing more than two dozen charges related to the bloodshed at the Tree of Life, which is located in the city’s traditionally Jewish Squirrel Hill neighbourhood.

The 46-six-year-old reportedly told police after his capture, “I just want to kill Jews,” having claimed on social media that Jews were helping transport caravans of refugees from Central America into the United States, calling the migrants “invaders”.

The caravans are a favourite target of the president, and he has called a group of several thousand impoverished mainly Honduran migrants currently attempting to walk north to the United States “an invasion”. 

‘Beautiful tribute’

Friends and strangers alike packed the Rodef Shalom temple, a 25-minute walk from the Tree of Life, for the Rosenthals’ funeral, which took place under tight security.

After the service, mourners spilled out onto the street, some of them sobbing and clasping each other.

The brothers’ caskets were placed in two hearses and driven away, with a sheriff’s car leading the procession.

Shooting Synagogue A casket is carried out of Rodef Shalom Congregation after the funeral services for brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal Source: Matt Rourke via PA Images

Later in the day, dozens of mourners walked behind the hearse carrying the remains of Rabinowitz in Squirrel Hill, according to footage posted on social media.

Meanwhile, protesters gathered near the Tree of Life synagogue to vent their anger.

“Saturday’s violence was a direct culmination of your influence,” said one organiser, reading from an open letter sent to Trump.

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you fully renounce white nationalism.

Jeffrey Myers, a rabbi who was present when the attack started, told CNN, said: “The president of the United States is always welcome”.

But protesters disagreed.

“I think it’s more divisive than uniting,” 57-year-old librarian Nonie Heystek said of Trump’s visit.

UPI 20181030 Protesters of the President Trump visit to the Pittsburgh gather a block away from the Tree of Life Synagogue in the Squirrel Hill Source: Archie Carpenter via PA Images

‘Christian rabbi’

The Pittsburgh shooting spree came in the same week that authorities arrested an ardent Trump supporter from Florida on suspicion of mailing more than a dozen homemade bombs to opponents and critics of the president.

The incidents have led to accusations that Trump has fanned violence through almost daily tweets and speeches lambasting illegal immigrants, political opponents and journalists in divisive language.

Trump has struck back in typically robust fashion, arguing that critical journalists were, in fact, the ones feeding extremism across the country.

“There is great anger in our Country caused in part by inaccurate, and even fraudulent, reporting of the news,” Trump tweeted.

Trump’s Pittsburgh visit is not the only element of the administration’s response to the massacre that has been a source of controversy.  

Michigan James Pence US Vice President Mike Pence honors victims of the recent mass shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh while speaking at the DeltaPlex Arena in Grand Rapids Source: Cory Morse | MLive.com via PA Images

On Monday, Vice President Mike Pence attended a campaign rally in Michigan at which a so-called “Christian rabbi” was invited to speak on behalf of the area’s Jewish community.

Instead of opening with prayers for the 11 victims of the Tree of Life shooting, Loren Jacobs praised Jesus Christ and then offered prayers for four Republican candidates.

Jacobs later offered words for the dead in the form of a prayer to Jesus Christ, without naming any of them.

Jews expressed outrage over social media, describing Jacobs’ appearance as an “insulting political stunt” and blasting Pence as a “Christian supremacist.”

© AFP 2018 

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