Readers like you keep news free for everyone.

More than 5,000 readers have already pitched in to keep free access to The Journal.

For the price of one cup of coffee each week you can help keep paywalls away.

Support us today
Not now
Advertisement

Polish official says Germany could owe Poland €690 billion for World War II damages

To date, Poland has not made an official demand.

Memorial on the grounds of the former German Nazi Death Camp Treblinka, near the village of Treblinka, northeast Poland
Memorial on the grounds of the former German Nazi Death Camp Treblinka, near the village of Treblinka, northeast Poland
Image: Alik Keplicz via AP

A POLISH OFFICIAL has said that Germany could owe his country €690 billion for the damage it inflicted during World War II.

Arkadiusz Mularczyk is leading a team in the parliament that is assessing potential reparations to Poland. Germany killed 6 million Polish citizens and caused great material losses during its nearly six-year occupation of Poland.

“We are talking about very large, but justified amounts of compensation for war crimes, for destroyed cities, villages and the lost demographic potential of our country,” Mularczyk said on Polsat News, a private broadcaster.

Last year, Poland’s ruling conservative-nationalist Law and Justice party said the nation deserves compensation for its losses and set up a team of lawmakers under Mularczyk’s leadership to estimate how much is due.

To date, Poland has not made an official demand. Germany has repeatedly said there is no legal basis for Poland’s reparation claims because the matter was settled in a 1953 agreement.

Poland’s current authorities have argued the 1953 decision is invalid because it was dictated by Moscow when Poland was a satellite of the Soviet Union.

Making a difference

A mix of advertising and supporting contributions helps keep paywalls away from valuable information like this article.

Over 5,000 readers like you have already stepped up and support us with a monthly payment or a once-off donation.

For the price of one cup of coffee each week you can make sure we can keep reliable, meaningful news open to everyone regardless of their ability to pay.

Since then, Germany has paid some compensation to individual Poles who were forced labourers or victims of German pseudo-medical experiments during the Nazis’ wartime occupation.

Read: Public appeal to find 17-year-old missing since Monday

More: Farmers struggling with dairy supplies as Storm Emma freezes pipes across the country

About the author:

Associated Press

Read next:

COMMENTS (95)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel