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Dublin: 15 °C Saturday 21 April, 2018

GIY: 'We really don’t need a heatwave – just a few days with the sun in the sky'

I don’t know how the poor plants will react if we skip spring altogether, writes Michael Kelly.

'Access to third level isn't on merit. It's a lottery based on which family you were born into'

Since 2011 State funding of third level education has plummeted by an incredible 25%, writes Paul Gavan.

Vaccines: 'Those of us from an earlier era must speak out to stop little lives being wrecked'

New parents have so little knowledge of diseases like measles that they think the vaccine is more dangerous than the disease, writes Dr Ida Milne.

Kilkenny mosque debate: 'This could become dangerous. Tensions could escalate'

This week I wished I lived in Ballaghadareen and not in Kilkenny, writes Malcolm Noonan.

Womenomics: 7 steps to make gender equality the new normal

Equality can improve men’s lives too, writes Victor Duggan.

Rate my rape list: 'I'm angry at the silence of the men of Ireland'

In the wake of the ‘rate my rape’ list on a school wall, Dr Cliona Saidlear says we have to talk about rape culture in Ireland.

Get ready world: 'Trump’s posturing is even more inconsistent and incoherent than Obama's'

But the potential for a conflict between the United States and Russia was, and may still be, on the brink, writes Larry Donnelly.

'My biggest regret is not reporting my rape. My rapist has a comfortable life with a wife and kids'

I am here, almost two years later, only just beginning to pick up the pieces of my own life, writes Morgan Barbour.

Magdalene Laundries: 'Memorial needed for women detained under heartless, vicious regime'

Sinn Féin leader Mary Lou McDonald argues work should begin on a memorial on the site of the Sean McDermott St Laundry.

'Our parish universe straddled two counties and two States. We forged an identity as borderers'

Darach MacDonald’s book Hard Border traces the roots of a century-old, hotly contested border that, after Brexit, will be the only land frontier between the UK and the EU.

Column: So you think adoption has nothing to do with you?

Adoption affects more of us than we realise. 900,000 people are directly affected by adoption or close to 20% of the current population of Ireland, writes Paul Redmond.

An immigrant fits in: 'I added 'sh' sounds to words and repeated the phrase 'Bono is a pox''

I knew very little about Ireland when I moved to Dublin almost 14 years ago, writes Laura Gerulyte Griffin.

In the garden: 'I find that my system is craving fresh greens after a long winter'

I just chop them and steam them over some boiling water for a few minutes and they are delicious, writes Michael Kelly.

Why I'd pull up a deckchair, skive off work and queue in the rain to buy a house

For me the process of buying a house was a draining and, at times, demoralising process.

Women in sport: 'We press pause on our lives, sacrificing friends, family and career'

I look forward to the day where words like ‘struggle’ and ‘sacrifice’ are no longer synonymous with a female athlete’s story, writes Ailis Egan.

Rape myths: 'Sexual assaults are traumatic. Incoherencies in the victims' accounts are inescapable'

It is important to remind ourselves what the research on rape and sexual assault has established, writes Ciaran McCullagh.

Are we about to see the opening shots of a third world war? Hopefully cool heads will prevail

Tom Clonan analyses the case for the US to send a message with airstrikes in Syria – but the consequences could be far-reaching and costly.

Bliain na Gaeilge: 'My mother made a choice to speak to us in her mother tongue'

The best news story as regards the language, though, is the emergence of what I see as a new movement, writes Róisín O’Hara.

Opinion: 'We don't need more leaflets from Teagasc. We don't need grants to build more sheds'

The way our climate is going, budgeting for a six, seven or even eight-month winter period is not beyond the realms of fantasy, writes Pippa Hackett.

D4 accents: 'Yes, kids speak differently from their parents. But why should this be a bad thing?'

Using elements of D4 speech does not necessarily mean rejecting the region you come from, writes Prof Vera Regan.

Peter Hain: 'The UK government is playing a dangerous game with the peace process'

Boris Johnston thinks that post Brexit, Armagh and Louth will be just the same as Camden and Westminster except with more Guinness, writes Peter Hain.

Opinion: How is it legal for schools to refuse to set up special classes?

Students with special educational needs have enough challenges place in front of them, they should not have to fight the education system as well, writes Graham Manning.

Column: 'We waited for three hours on the side of the road in the dark and cold. I'm sick of it'

This is an issue that wheelchair users face on a daily basis, writes Linda Byrne.

Marriage has some very tasty tax benefits attaching to it: Here's how to claim them

The first big benefit of being married is that you get to choose how you are taxed, writes John Lowe.

'Sonia was almost the perfect Irish hero: courageous, determined, yet fragile and all too human'

Moreover, Irish sport has continually demonstrated our nation’s capacity to unite behind certain events and certain individuals, writes Dr Richard McElligott.

Column: 'I have to teach myself to smile (I didn't realise it was so easy to lose a smile)'

53-year-old Bandon native Fiach Lynch has MS and is running the Cork City Marathon in June.

Michael Kelly’s top tips for putting food and food growing at the centre of your workplace GIY

Michael Kelly’s top tips for putting food and food growing at the centre of your workplace

Food growing is a simple, practical way to really engage employees, writes Michael Kelly.

Survivors of sexual violence are let down by the criminal justice system – here’s what should happen

The poor treatment of survivors, when combined with few perpetrators being convicted and a perception of lenient sentencing, could tacitly signal to society a “decriminalisation of rape”, writes Dr Simon McCarthy-Jones.

Play golf on paternity leave? You're lucky to have time to breathe

The government is reportedly considering making paid paternity leave mandatory for all new fathers.

Homelessness: Do we want an Ireland modelled on Vancouver where the majority prosper?

I live in Vancouver. Now, watching Ireland’s homelessness crisis developing from here, it’s hard not to see these two worlds coming closer and closer together, writes Richard MacCarthy.

Opinion: 'Religious instruction and worship should take place outside core school hours'

This proposal seeks to find a workable compromise between different belief groups at minimum cost, writes David Graham.

Opinion: 'Consent can't be delivered in the same way as other subjects by embarrassed teachers'

We need trained facilitators in schools to develop sexual competence and protect the sexual health of young people, writes Elaine Byrnes.

'We can't ignore the very real possibility of the emergence of a new disruptive politics'

Irish politics remains volatile with the potential for alternative political parties emerging, writes Rory Hearne.

Why I became a counsellor: 'Mentally, I’ve gone toe-to-toe with Mike Tyson'

When I was younger, counselling was close to the last thing I would have considered, writes Danny McNeive.

Stephen Hawking: 'I clearly remember being blown away by the mind-bending physics of the book'

Here in Ireland, we are now testing some of these exotic ideas with a brand new radio telescope at Birr, writes Professor Peter Gallagher.

Peter McVerry: 'It should be made illegal for the next three years to evict people onto the street'

To declare a housing and homeless emergency would enable emergency actions to be taken for a short period of time, writes Peter McVerry.

Irish emigrant: 'I'm more concerned now about the Great Barrier Reef than the Irish summer'

Emigrants don’t really have much choice – unless we want to spend our life looking back wistfully and wondering about what might have been if we’d stayed, writes Philip Lynch.

Eileen Paisley: 'I think there was a quietness and shyness about Martin. He was good company'

Jude Collins’ Martin McGuinness: The Man I Knew was released to commemorate the first anniversary of the passing of one of Ireland’s most iconic politicians. This is an extract of Eileen Paisley’s account of his friendship with her husband, Ian Paisley.

Column: 'I felt a wave of guilt come over me. How was I laughing in a world my mum wasn’t in?'

There is no guide to tell you how to cope with life after loss, writes Mairead Doyle.

GIY: Our guru's 'nerdy' guide to growing onions for home-made marmalade

This onion marmalade recipe is a sinch to make so if by chance you still have a glut of onions from last year, writes Michael Kelly.

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