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Dublin: 17 °C Tuesday 25 June, 2019
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"A very grim situation": Further flooding expected this morning at high tide

Met Éireann’s orange weather warning is due to remain in place until 3pm today.

Kilkee, Co Clare.
Kilkee, Co Clare.

Updated 8.30am

HEAVY RAIN, A risk of coastal flooding, and strong winds of up to 100km/h will all persist until later this afternoon, Met Éireann has said this morning.

An orange weather warning was in place overnight and will remain until 3pm today, with a wind warning for counties Dublin, Louth, Wexford, Wicklow, Meath, Cork, Kerry and Waterford.

Winds are due to ease off early this afternoon, although the weather will remain “very unsettled” for the rest of the week.

High tide

Many areas on the west coast have experienced severe flooding following torrential weather over the weekend, and with high tide due this morning, further flooding is expected.

Flooding has been reported throughout Cork city centre, as well as areas of Kerry and Waterford.

Irish Rail says that bus transfers are in place between Limerick and Ennis due to flooding.

Minister Brian Hayes, who has responsibility for the Office of Public Works, is due to travel to some of the worst affected areas in Limerick later today.

Speaking to RTÉ’s Morning Ireland he said it is a “very grim situation”.

The Minister said that the current €10 million set aside for immediate humanitarian relief will not be enough, and that he hopes that Limerick can meet the deadline of tomorrow for requesting additional funds for repairing flood damage.

He stressed that his Department will spending in excess of €44 million on new flood relief measures over the coming year.

Also speaking to Morning Ireland, Paul Crowe of Limerick City and County Council said that national assistance will “certainly” be sought for the clean-up effort there, noting that the extent of it surpasses “the resources of the city and county on its own”.

He said that between 200 and 300 households, and up to a thousand people, had been affected by the flooding in the city, and described the damage as “very extensive”.

Locals described the flooding in the city yesterday as the worst ever seen.

Originally published 7.58am

Pics: Limerick residents return home to assess flood devastation >

The aftermath: “Nobody in the city can ever recall such severe flooding” >

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Nicky Ryan

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