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Dublin: 6°C Monday 21 September 2020
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This Dublin bridge was turned into a giant harp last night

Call it a musical makeover.

Opening of Tiger Dublin Fringe. Pictur Source: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland

IT’S ALREADY AN impressive sight – a huge bridge named after one of our finest writers, and located in Dublin City.

But last night, the Samuel Beckett Bridge was turned into a giant harp to usher in the beginning the Tiger Dublin Fringe 2014 festival.

The unique musical and visual piece was created by Ulysses Opera Theatre.

Opening of Tiger Dublin Fringe. Pictur Source: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland

They had 100 performers on and around the bridge and river, and illuminated the sky with a series of light displays.

Here’s how it sounded (and looked) from the quays:

Source: Scott De Buitléir/YouTube

This is the 20th year of Fringe, so it was an opportunity to take on something massive to announce its return to the capital.

Tom Lane, the composer, said his work was inspired by the frequencies of the supports (staves) of the bridge or ‘strings’.

So, how did it work? Well, the strings were ‘played’ by dancers and drummers from the MaSamba Samba School, featuring brass players from the Dublin Concert Band.

Opening of Tiger Dublin Fringe. Pictur Source: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland

They were accompanied by a 50-strong choir led by members of Dublin’s music ensemble, Tonnta.

The composition loosely re-told the Harp of Dagda, an old Irish mythical tale:

where a harp of great power that could restore harmony, align the four seasons and bring great joy to the nation. When the Harp was stolen, it would not sing, but when the Tuatha dé Danann reclaimed it, order was restored and a great celebration ensued.

Ulysses Opera Theatre comprises director Conor Hanratty, Tom Lane and producer Matthew Smyth.

Opening of Tiger Dublin Fringe. Pictur Source: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland

Hanratty said they got lots of support from local businesses when putting the performance together.

There will be 83 productions in nearly 40 venues during Tiger Dublin Fringe 2014, which runs across Dublin city from September 5 – 20.

Read: Not sure what to see at the Tiger Fringe? Let us help>

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