Advertisement

We need your help now

Support from readers like you keeps The Journal open.

You are visiting us because we have something you value. Independent, unbiased news that tells the truth. Advertising revenue goes some way to support our mission, but this year it has not been enough.

If you've seen value in our reporting, please contribute what you can, so we can continue to produce accurate and meaningful journalism. For everyone who needs it.

The application process to be a census enumerator will open next month. Conor McCabe
you fill up my census

Fancy counting for cash? Ten weeks part-time work could earn you €2,400

The CSO is looking for census enumerators.

NEXT YEAR WILL see Ireland’s 26th census and it will require up to 2.3 million census forms to be distributed around the country.

The Central Statistics Office will employ 4,660 people on a temporary basis to deliver these forms and the office has today announced details of that application process.

Competition for the 10-week-job as a census enumerator is always tough and the CSO says they will be accepting up to 15,000 applications.

Enumerators are paid a fixed fee for the delivery and collection of census forms in their area along with fixed allowances for training, home storage, Sunday working and travel.

The CSO says that enumerators will earn approximately €2,400 for the ten week period.

Applications open on 5 January and will stay open for three days unless the 15,000 limit is reached first.

Next year’s census will be held on 24 April 2016, just over five years after the last population count on 10 April 2011.

The last census recorded that the population of Ireland was 4,588,252.

Aside from the topline population figure, the census also records other information including age, religion and employment. Next year’s census will have 30 different questions.

The census forms will be delivered by the enumerators in the five-week period between 21 March and 24 April.

Information on becoming a census enumerator can be found on the census website.

Read: Births, deaths, crimes, marriages and sales – A snapshot of a year in Ireland >

Read: Ever wondered what a census at a Zoo looks like? >

Readers like you are keeping these stories free for everyone...
A mix of advertising and supporting contributions helps keep paywalls away from valuable information like this article. Over 5,000 readers like you have already stepped up and support us with a monthly payment or a once-off donation.

Your Voice
Readers Comments
82
    Submit a report
    Please help us understand how this comment violates our community guidelines.
    Thank you for the feedback
    Your feedback has been sent to our team for review.