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Podcast

The Explainer: What is the council’s new transport plan for Dublin city?

We’re joined by Brian Caulfield, transportation professor and and Head of the Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering at Trinity College Dublin, to see what the impacts could be.

WHETHER YOU’RE A motorist, cyclist or pedestrian – and, of course, you can be all three – most people travelling through Dublin will have noticed how clogged up Dublin is by cars.

This leads to gridlock, pollution and a general agreement that it makes the city a little harder to tolerate.

Dublin City Council has developed a plan to tackle this – the Dublin City Centre Transport Plan – with elements due to come into force in August. Major changes to the flow of parts of the quays are included in the plan, as is a further limiting of access to College Green.

On this week’s episode of The Explainer, we’re looking at the details of the plan to examine it’s aim and how it will achieve that, as well as what the overall reaction has been.

We’re joined by Brian Caulfield, transportation professor and and Head of the Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering at Trinity College Dublin, to see what the impacts could be.


The Explainer / SoundCloud

This episode was put together by presenter Laura Byrne, executive producer Sinéad O’Carroll and senior producer Nicky Ryan.

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