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Dublin: 12 °C Wednesday 23 October, 2019
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Investors more confident in Ireland, but fearful for global economy

RaboDirect’s investor barometer says 37 per cent of Irish investors are confident about the country’s short-term outlook.

IRISH INVESTORS’ confidence in the national economy has stabilised, a survey has found – with the same number confident about Ireland’s short-term outlook as in a similar survey six months ago.

The RaboDirect Investor Barometer shows 37 per cent of investors being confident about the Irish economy in three months, exactly the same proportion as in the previous index from April.

Similarly, 76 per cent of investors are confident about their own personal situation – up from 74 per cent last time – while the overall index has stabilised at 86.9 per cents, up very slightly from six months ago. The figure reflects slightly negative sentiment, however; it ranges from 0 to 200, with 100 a neutral score.

Worryingly, though, the index reflects unease among Irish investors about the broader global outlook – with only 34 per cent of investors confident about the global economy, down from 57 per cent in April.

Those findings reflect the projections of other bodies, including the EU-IMF Troika, who have warned that turbulence in economies in central Europe could damage Ireland’s export sector.

72 per cent of investors believe there is now value for money in the global stock market, compared to 66 per cent in April – with shares now being the preferred asset over cash.

RaboDirect investment manager Killian Nolan said the survey offered “offer some reassurance regarding investor sentiment and their confidence in the Irish economy and, importantly, their own personal finances”.

“It will be interesting to see whether this continues beyond the next budget and into 2013,” he said.

Read: EU report says Irish homes hit second-hardest by economic slump

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Gavan Reilly

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