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Dublin: 16 °C Saturday 20 July, 2019
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44% of Irish workers admit to having been drunk at work

That means there’s probably someone drunk in your job right now.

Image: Dan Pupius via Flickr/Creative Commons

NEARLY HALF OF Irish people have shown up to work drunk, a new survey has suggested.

Dublin-based law consultancy Peninsula Ireland questioned 1,353 Irish employees by telephone and found that 44% had been under the influence while at work and 77% of employees have had to discipline staff for being under the influence.

Alan Price, managing director of Peninsula Ireland said that there is a big difference between going out the night before and showing up to work still drunk.

“Employees who attend work under the influence of alcohol are not just putting themselves at risk but also the safety of others. It is fine heading to the pub at lunch for a quick drink or enjoying a few beers with your friends the night before, however when does it impede your job?”

Price says that some companies might consider random testing for employees to determine if they’re under the influence.

“It puts the safety and reputation of your business on the line. Employers may well wish to introduce random drug and alcohol testing into polices and if this is the case then they can implement at their discretion.”

The World Health Organisation says that one person dies from alcohol-related illness in Ireland every day and, while rates of binge drinking are falling, 75% of all alcohol consumed in Ireland is done as part of a binge drinking session.

Read: We spent €50 million a week on alcohol in 2013 – and 75% of that was binge drinking

Read: Ireland’s alcohol consumption in one handy infographic

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