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The Irish Navy's LÉ Emer is now in the Nigerian navy

We’ll miss ol’ Emer… or as she’s now known, NNS Prosperity.

LÉ Emer (P21) Leads The Parade Of Sail - Tall Ships Festival Dublin 2012 Source: infomatique via Flickr/Creative Commons

IT WAS REVEALED last month that the Government donated a naval ship, the LÉ Aoife, to Malta.

The locals weren’t too pleased - because it means the money for upkeep and running will still have to come from the taxpayer.

Meanwhile, another of our former vessels was officially commissioned in its new role.

According to the Nigerian media, the LÉ Emer is now in the hands of the Nigerian navy, under the more international name of NNS Prosperity (the others are Okpabana, Centenary, and Sagbama).

CAJ News Africa reports that it acquired solely for use as a training ship.

The ship was sold to a Nigerian marine security company at auction for a ‘bargain’ price of €320,000, according to reports in October 2013.

The 38-year-old LÉ Emer will be replaced by the LE Samuel Beckett.

PastedImage-70370 The former LÉ Emer is on the left.

The new ships entering service comes at time when the country’s military is facing a daily battle against Boko Haram.

The Premium Times quotes President Goodluck Jonathan, speaking at the commissioning ceremony, as saying:

As the lead maritime security agency, therefore, the NN deserves all the support it needs to effectively carry out its statutory roles.The four ships being inaugurated today are part of a total of eight ships that are expected to be commissioned into the NN fleet in 2015.

A spokesperson for the Department of Defence said:

LÉ Emer was sold to a Nigerian buyer (Uniglobe Industrial Services Ltd, a Nigerian registered company) for €320k by the Department of Defence following a public auction held in Cork in October 2013.Following the completion of the sale of the ship (which did not include any military equipment) and transfer of ownership, the Department has had no further involvement with the vessel.

Read: We’ve just given Malta a naval ship, instead of selling it >

More: We gave them a ship … but some people in Malta aren’t AT ALL happy about it >

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Nicky Ryan

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