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Dublin: 5 °C Monday 17 February, 2020
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The Explainer: How does Met Éireann decide on weather warnings?

Forecasting the weather is a complicated business, so this week on The Explainer we’re looking at how Met Éireann decides on whether a warning should be status yellow, orange, or red.

IN IRELAND, WE really do love talking about the weather – and often guiding the importance of these conversations is Met Éireann’s colour coding system.

It has been used over the past decade, but though it sounds simple it’s often not that straight-forward. From an anecdotal point of view, some weather conditions with lower ratings have felt the same as others with higher ratings, sometimes they’re announced at the last minute, or others seem to signal impending doom pass without incident.

But we know that forecasting the weather is a complicated business, so this week on The Explainer we’re looking at how Met Éireann decides on whether a warning is status yellow, orange, or red.

Joining us in studio is TheJournal.ie reporter Sean Murray, and we speak to the national meteorological service’s head of forecasting Evelyn Cusack, who explains what goes on behind the scenes when meteorologists are looking at looming bad weather, what considerations are made when deciding to alert the public to bad weather – and why Storm Lorenzo seemed like it was going to be worse than it actually was.


Source: The Explainer/SoundCloud

This episode was put together by presenter, assistant producer, and technical operator Nicky Ryan, producer Aoife Barry, and executive producer Christine Bohan. Reporter was Sean Murray. Design by Palash Somani.

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Nicky Ryan

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