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The fate of Ireland's 250 ghost estates: 5 things to know in property this week

Five of the biggest property stories from this week in five minutes flat.

PROPERTY NEWS MOVES fast, and it can be tricky to keep up with all that happens in just a week.

But don’t worry – we’re here to help with our weekly cheat sheet: take a break, and catch up with goings-on around the country.

This week, Shelbourne Park gets an overhaul, and we find out what’s to come of Ireland’s hundreds of ghost estates.

1) Here’s how many ghost estates still remain in Ireland

3889449 Source: Mark Stedman/RollingNews.ie

There are more than 250 so-called ‘ghost estates’ leftover from the boom, but few if any will be of much use to the main housebuilders, according to one analyst.

A government report that’s due to be published later today has found that there are 256 unfinished housing developments across the country, down from almost 3,000 nearly a decade ago. That’s a 91% decrease, but the fate of the estates remains uncertain.

2) Shelbourne Park to get multi-million euro facelift

steve-nash-shelbourne Source: Steve Nash

Shelbourne Park, Ringsend’s 90-year-old greyhound racing stadium, is to get an upgrade as part of a strategic plan to reinvigorate the sport in Ireland. This comes after the park was forced to close for 22 weeks last year due to a dispute over the sale of Harold’s Cross Greyhound Stadium.

It is said that €3 million will be invested in the stadium over five years, with the CEO of the Irish Greyhound Board, Gerard Dollard, saying that “facilities are badly in need of upgrading to meet the needs and expectations of the modern-day consumer”.

3) FF and Green Party propose housing crisis solutions

shutterstock-kolo-5 Source: Shutterstock/Kolo-5

Both the Green Party and Fianna Fáil put forward potential solutions to the ongoing housing crisis this week, with Green Party leader Eamon Ryan calling for the government to take an “active role in providing homes for people.”

Ryan’s party proposed that state lands be developed for rental housing, and Fianna Fáil put forward a bill that would see increased regulation of vulture funds, particularly when it comes to buy-to-let properties. The discussion is ongoing in the Dáil.

4) Croke Park was snow-free during Storm Emma – here’s why

air corps-twitter Source: Air Corps/Twitter

Ireland felt the full force of Storm Emma this week, with snow drifts as deep as 7 ft across the country. The eastern parts of Ireland were the worst affected – so how did Croke Park stay a healthy emerald during the storm?

Stadium Director Peter McKenna told The42.ie that Croke Park uses undersoil heating for cold snaps such as these. McKenna also noted that the pristine pitch would have been well able to host the scheduled Dublin-Kerry League match, but made the decision to postpone with supporters in mind.

5) Water shortages to continue across Ireland “for days or weeks”

Shutterstock-Stanislaw Mikulski-water Source: Shutterstock/Stanislaw Mikulski

As of the middle of the week, Irish Water was still reporting 23,000 homes around Ireland without water, in the aftermath of Storm Emma. In addition, 39,000 homes were under water usage restrictions, with these numbers subject to change due to ongoing bursts and repairs.

Speaking to TheJournal.ie, an Irish Water spokesperson said that “it will take time for the network to recharge and for water pressure to build up”. Updated information about water in your area can be found here.

And finally, this week’s property buzzword…

We’re breaking down the complicated world of property jargon, one buzzword at a time. This week, it’s a duplex, as featured in this week’s Price Comparison section.  Duplex is a US term for a home on two or more floors connected by an inner staircase, though the design can also be open-plan. 

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