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Leo calls housing crisis a 'national emergency': 5 things to know in property this week

Plus, a long-derelict Dublin building is set to get a makeover.

TAKE A BREAK, NOW that the long weekend has started and catch up with all the biggest property stories from around Ireland.

The best part? We promise to catch you up in five minutes flat.

This week, the housing crisis hits the news again, a car ban in Cork comes into action, and Dublin is set to get a new food hall…

1) Housing crisis now a government priority, says Leo

article Source: Eamonn Farrell/RollingNews.ie

The current housing and homelessness crisis was debated in the Dáil this week, with An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar saying that the situation was “a national emergency”. He also acknowledged that this statement would not solve the problem, but that improving housing numbers is a top priority for the government.

Meanwhile, the Real Estate Alliance’s average house price index was released this week: it shows that the average price of a three-bed, semi-detached home has increased by 9% in the past year.

2) Hotel mogul says Dublin needs to ‘grow up’

article (1) Source: Matt Buck/Flickr

The deputy head of Dalata, one of Ireland’s largest hotel groups, has hit out at the industry, saying that planning is not reaching the required standard in the country.

“We just have to sort of grow up a little bit like other European cities and say, ‘We have a city here. We’re driving traffic out. We’re driving everything out.’” Stephen McNally said, saying that the time taken to clear planning permission is slowing down the construction of much-needed hotel spaces.

3) Could this Dublin church become a dine-out spot?

article (2) Source: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ie

Michael Wright, the man behind The Wright Venue in Swords, has won a licence to overhaul St Andrew’s Church in Dublin city centre. Wright intends to pour €5 million into a complete facelift of the historic St Andrew’s Church into a space that will include a food court, banqueting hall and culture centre.

The judge ruled that Wright could get a seven-day drinks licence as long as the re-fit is done in accordance with Dublin City Council planning permission.

4) Cork city car ban causes uproar

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Locals have slammed new restrictions on cars in Cork city centre for “hammering the character of Cork”. The restrictions are part of the the City Centre Movement Strategy, and will include parking restrictions, new CCTV cameras in the Patrick’s Street area, and lengthen pay parking times.

The changes have been welcomed by Bus Éireann, who hope the move will improve traffic flow. However, Cork City Councillor Tim Brosnan (FF) thinks otherwise, predicting traffic jams and a knock-on effect on suburban traffic.

5) Fresh plans for this derelict Dublin building

pastedimage-6370 Source: Killian Woods/Fora

Planning permission has been submitted for 41-46 South Great George’s Street, a former outlet store that has lain vacant since the 1990s. The 3,176 sq m. property consists of 3-4 storeys and a basement at present, but Grosam Properties Limited have submitted a plan to build a 100-room, five-storey hotel in the space, as well as three retail units. 

Past plans were submitted in 2006 and 2016, for a six-storey retail space, and in 2015, The Irish Times reported that the building changed hands for €7 million.

And finally, this week’s property buzzword…

We’re breaking down the complicated world of property jargon, one buzzword at a time. This week, it’s castellation, a design feature you’ll spot in Dream Home. A castellated home is one ”furnished with turrets and battlements” – not exactly common in Ireland! 

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