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Student protesters light a flare as police contain them outside the entrance to Millbank Tower, housing the headquarters of the Conservative Party, during a protest in London yesterday. Alastair Grant/AP/Press Association Images
Student March

UK police launch investigation after London's student protest violence

Slideshow: images from the scene of yesterday’s protest where demonstrators clashed with police and smashed windows at the Conservative party’s HQ.

POLICE IN THE UK are to launch an inquiry into its preparations for yesterday’s student march in London, which ended in violent clashes between protesters and police.

Thirty-five arrests were made after protesters stormed the Conservative party building, the BBC reports.

Although police had largely taken control of the building by about 5pm yesterday, about two dozen people continued their stand-off.

A statement from the Met police service yesterday said it had worked closely with the National Union of Students during its planning for a peaceful protest against an increase in third-level tuition fees.

The Met said it had developed its response plan on the basis of the information provided by the NUS regarding the march and that a small minority of people caused damage to property.

The NUS condemned the “violent actions of rogue protesters” and accused them of undermining the students’ peaceful protest.

Police have been criticised for failing to adequately anticipate the disorder that arose, the Guardian reports. The Met Commissioner said yesterday’s violence was “an embarrassment for London” and for the police.

A group of people clashed with officers and occupied the Conservative party headquarters, shattering windows and throwing fire extinguishers out of the building onto the street below.

This compilation of news footage shows disruptions outside the Conservative party’s HQ in Millbank:

Prime Minister David Cameron welcomed the police inquiry, saying he had been concerned for the safety of people working in the area. He said that while people could protest, violence was not acceptable, according to the BBC.

The British government proposes raising university tuition fees from about £3,200 to £9,000 a year.

Speaking at the protest yesterday, NUS President Aaron Porter said: “We will not tolerate the previous generation passing on its debts to the next, nor will we pick up an eye-watering bill to access a college and university education that was funded for them”.

UK police launch investigation after London's student protest violence
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  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees

  • Britain Protest University Fees