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Safety watchdog releases nightmarish photos of toys being destroyed as warning to parents

Over 51,000 toys have been destroyed by the CCPC in the last few years.

OVER 51,000 UNSAFE toys have been destroyed the Competition & Consumer Protection Commission in the last seven years, and the safety watchdog has released some haunting imagines as a warning to parents buying gifts this Christmas. 

The unlucky toys – ranging from soft toys, teddy bears, toy guns, inflatable toys with small parts and battery-operated toy dogs – were found in a number of consignments from different importers.

The 51,392 toys were deemed unsafe for use by Irish consumers after inspections found they did not meet the relevant EU and Irish safety standards and regulation.

The risks ranged from potential choke hazards to chemical issues, contravening several toy safety regulations.

The destruction process is the last step in a long legal process, but will most likely be the root cause of future nightmares. 

Cover your children’s eyes now. 

CCPC destroys over 51,000 unsafe or non-compliant childrens toys_03 Source: Conor Whyte/CCPC

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CCPC destroys over 51,000 unsafe or non-compliant childrens toys_01 (1) Source: Conor Whyte/CCPC

CCPC destroys over 51,000 unsafe or non-compliant childrens toys_04 Source: Conor Whyte/CCPC

CCPC destroys over 51,000 unsafe or non-compliant childrens toys_02 Source: Conor Whyte/CCPC

With the large volume of poor quality, unsafe or non-compliant products being imported into Ireland, the CPCC has created a checklist of what to look out for to ensure parents are ‘safety aware’ this Christmas. 

  • Check for the CE mark on toys before you buy them. The CE mark is a manufacturer’s declaration that the product complies with EU safety regulations and standards. 
  • Buy from a reputable retailer to avoid unsafe, non-compliant toys, or toys with a fake CE mark. If you’re buying online do some quick research, check reviews and social media pages, and where the business is based. 
  • Check for detachable parts smaller than €2 Coin as anything smaller than this could be a potential choking hazard for children.
  • Check age guidance instructions on all children’s toys, in particular 0-3 years, before you buy them. 
  • Check for sharp edges, long cords or cables and avoid dangerous or fold-away parts or small holes that could trap children’s fingers.

About the author:

Adam Daly

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