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Fail! Over 50 per cent of vehicles did not pass the NCT this year

More than 2,300 vehicles were deemed to be dangerous and failed the test.

File photo
File photo
Image: Julien Behal/PA Wire/Press Association Images

MORE THAN HALF of the motors that have been examined for road suitability and safety so far this year have failed the National Car Test (NCT).

Results for the first six months of 2012, which have been published by the test centres, reveal that just 295,610 vehicles passed first time around. That means just 49.6 per cent were deemed roadworthy.

Almost 300,000 cars failed and had to return for retests, where the majority (over 90 per cent) passed.

Of those original failures, 2,349 were given a ‘dangerous’ result and taken off the roads. More than 300 did not pass the retest either.

A vehicle is slapped with the dangerous sticker when a defect that is deemed an immediate risk to road safety is discovered. It is an offence to drive such a vehicle on a public road. Fines of up to €5,000 can be imposed, as well as penalty points and/or a three-month jail term.

Last year, just over 50 per cent of vehicles passed first time. The main reasons for failing include front suspension, headlamp aim, tyre condition, brake line/hoses and wheels.

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The initial test costs €55 and the re-test is another €28. Vehicles are required to be tested every two years once they are four-years old. Annual testing is now a legal requirement for cars 10 years or older.

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