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Dublin: 3 °C Wednesday 11 December, 2019
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Housing Minister gives green light to 800 new social and voluntary houses

Approximately €100 million will be spent on housing units between now and 2014 including €35 million for the voluntary housing sector.

Image: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland

MINISTER FOR HOUSING and Planning, Jan O’Sullivan, announced yesterday the green light for proposals from local authorities for over 800 new social and voluntary housing units.

At a cost of approximately €100 million, the units will come on stream between now and 2014.

These new permanent housing units are intended for the most part to provide accommodation for people with special housing needs including the elderly, homeless persons and people with a disability.

O’Sullivan said she was particularly pleased to be able to provide the finding for this housing “against the backdrop of a very challenging fiscal climate”.

“Everyone knows that Government finances are very restricted.  As Housing Minister I am determined that the much reduced capital budget available is targeted at those most in need.”

Some €35 million is earmarked for the voluntary housing sector for the provision of 377 housing units across 30 local authorities.

O’Sullivan said voluntary housing bodies, often in conjunction with the HSE, provide a range of services and supports to tenants, thus enabling older persons to continue to live independent lives in their own community.

“Adding 377 new housing units to the voluntary stock will have a positive impact for a lot of people and allow elderly people, in particular, to continue to live in and contribute to their own community. ”

Local authorities will be allocated some €65 million for the purchase of an estimated 246 houses and the construction of a further 185 houses, largely to meet special housing needs.

The minister said most construction projects are ‘infill’ development in existing communities which has the additional benefit of contributing to the vibrancy of a community, enhancing streetscapes and eliminating the risk of anti-social behaviour in neighbourhoods.

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