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Dublin: 3 °C Wednesday 13 November, 2019
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Two in five to ignore Revenue's advice and opt for lower property tax figure

The survey revealed that only 22 per cent said they agreed with the introduction of the tax.

Image: House via Shutterstock

OVER HALF OF property owners say they are unhappy with Revenue’s assessment for the local property tax.

According to a MyHome.ie survey, two out of five say they will go with a lower figure than the one advised by Revenue, while 8 per cent said will go with a higher figure. More than 75 per cent of respondents said they had already worked out how much they intend to pay.

With the recent news that local councils will be allowed to increase the property tax by up to 15 per cent from September next year, 55 per cent of respondents said they were opposed to local authorities being given these powers.

Only 22 per cent said they agreed with the introduction of the tax.

Respondents said the Property Price Register was the most popular tool used to calculate the tax, Angela Keegan Managing Director of MyHome.ie said “it was interesting to note that 23 per cent listed estate agent valuations while 18 per cent said they were using a neighbour’s assessment. The latter may indicate that residents in some neighbourhoods are agreeing a joint approach.”

According to the survey 59 per cent of respondents felt the tax discriminated against city dwellers while 41 per cent didn’t.

Three in five landlords said they would not pass on the tax to their tenants, 13 per cent said they would and 26 per cent said they were in the undecided camp.

Revenue said the were “happy” with the property tax payments after the postal deadline was up on 7 May.The deadline for payment of the tax online is 28 May.

Read: Consumers ‘weathering the storm’ as experts predict recession is bottoming out>

More: Revenue “happy” with property tax payments after deadline passes>

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Amy Croffey

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