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Students set off on cycling fundraiser for Pieta House

Senator David Norris has pledged his support for the fundraiser, which will raise money for Pieta House. This organisation helps people dealing with self-harm or suicidal thoughts.

President of Maynooth Students for Charity Shane Lynn, cyclists Ciara Galvin, Senator David Norris, cyclist Ruairi Nolan and collector Rebecca Mahoney.
President of Maynooth Students for Charity Shane Lynn, cyclists Ciara Galvin, Senator David Norris, cyclist Ruairi Nolan and collector Rebecca Mahoney.

A GROUP OF National University of Maynooth  students will undertake a mammoth cycle from Maynooth to Galway this weekend in order to raise funds for Pieta House.

Independent Senator David Norris met with participants of the 24th annual Galway Cycle yesterday at the Garden of Remembrance and pledged his support for their work.

This year’s event is being run to raise funds for Pieta House, The Centre for the Prevention of Self-Harm or Suicide and will see more than 120 people cycling from Maynooth to Galway and back over the weekend.

They left Kildare this morning, Friday, March 25 and will arrive back Maynooth on Sunday, March 27.

The event is organised by Maynooth Students for Charity which has raised more than €700,000 for various charities in the past 24 years.

Pieta House was set up by psychologist Joan Freeman, and officially opened its doors in January 2006. So far it has seen and helped over 3000 people, opened up two Outreach Centres, and two other Centres of Excellence in both Dublin and Limerick.

Earlier this month, Cindy O’Connor, clinical director and deputy chief executive of Pieta House said there has been a huge increase in their numbers being referred from secondary schools, with 300 under-18s being referred to the centre last year with self-harm and suicidal ideation. The youngest referred was aged seven, reported the Irish Times.

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