This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 16 °C Wednesday 26 September, 2018
Advertisement

Number of websites infected by cryptocurrency hack, Ireland's National Cyber Security Centre says

It said that there are no indications at this stage that members of the public are at risk.

Image: Wit Olszewski via Shutterstock

IRELAND’S NATIONAL CYBER Security Centre (NCSC) has said that it is aware that a number of websites have been infected by hackers using the sites’ to “mine” cryptocurrencies without their permission.

Thousands of websites around the world, including many operated by governments, have been affected by the breach, security researchers have said.

The attack is the first major incident made public in which a new breed of hackers took over a large number of websites to effectively create currencies like bitcoin which are generated by using computing power.

The attacks made public over the weekend by British security researcher Scott Helme showed more than 4,000 websites were infected in this manner, including those of the British data protection and privacy watchdog and the US federal courts system.

The NCSC said it has issued an advisory to all its constituents of government departments and agencies, as well as critical national infrastructure providers, “informing them of the issue and outlining a number of mitigation tech steps to prevent similar types of incidents occurring in the future”.

It said that there are no indications at this stage that members of the public are at risk. It has not indicated which websites have been infected by the hack.

“The NCSC will continue to monitor developments in relation to this matter.”

Type of attack

Unlike traditional attacks, these infections do not contain “ransomware” or steal data, but operate in stealth mode to make profits from the shadowy world of cryptocurrencies.

Helme said in a blog post yesterday that the hackers were able to reach large numbers of websites by infecting a commonly used “plug-in”, or software which helps a site run better.

In this case, the hackers used the malicious software to create Monero, one of several new cryptocurrencies which are making a splash in financial markets.

“If you want to load a crypto miner on 1,000+ websites you don’t attack 1,000+ websites, you attack the 1 website that they all load content from,” he said.

The creator of the plug-in, the British software firm TextHelp, said it took the affected software offline after it discovered the “attempt to illegally generate cryptocurrency”.

“This was a criminal act and a thorough investigation is currently underway,” the company said in a statement.

Increasing risk of attacks

Researchers have been warning in recent weeks about this kind of malware, which can deliver profits without being obvious to users.

Security researchers at Cisco Talos warned last month that this kind of hacking activity “has exponentially increased.”

Because of the huge financial gains in cryptocurrencies, Cisco researchers said this has become a prime target for hackers.

“At a high-level mining is simply using system resources to solve large mathematical calculations which result in some amount of cryptocurrency being awarded to the solvers,” Cisco researchers wrote in a research note.

Security researcher Graham Cluley said the latest attack highlights vulnerabilities in websites which may have weaknesses in third-party components.

“Things could have been much worse,” Cluley said in a blog post. “Imagine if the plug-in had been tampered with to steal login passwords rather than steal CPU resources from visiting computers.”

The NCSC is an operational arm of the Department of Communications, founded in 2011 and is responsible for overseeing the cybersecurity of government IT infrastructure.

With reporting by AFP. 

Read: Irish banks monitoring bitcoin buys on credit cards after UK bank brings in ban

More: Bitcoin brain teaser: This cryptic painting just earned someone €40,000

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

Read next:

COMMENTS (23)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel

     

    Trending Tags