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Your evening longread: 'I met Edward Snowden - and since then I haven't stopped watching my back'

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

Image: DPA/PA Images

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

For the next few weeks, we’ll be bringing you an evening longread to enjoy which will help you to escape the news cycle.

We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

Edward Snowden

Barton Gellman writes about the impact and aftermath of meeting the whistleblower Edward Snowden, which led to him being under investigation by the US government.

(The Atlantic, approx 25 mins reading time)

He resisted questioning about his private life, but he allowed that he missed small things from home. Milkshakes, for one. Why not make your own? Snowden refused to confirm or deny possession of a blender. Like all appliances, blenders have an electrical signature when switched on. He believed that the U.S. government was trying to discover where he lived. He did not wish to offer clues, electromagnetic or otherwise. U.S. intelligence agencies had closely studied electrical emissions when scouting Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Pakistan. “Raising the shields and lowering the target surface” was one of Snowden’s security mantras.

Read all of the Evening Longreads here>

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