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Your evening longread: How the protesters in Hong Kong are still fighting back - one year on

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

Protesters shine their phone lights while marching in commemoration of the first year anniversary
Protesters shine their phone lights while marching in commemoration of the first year anniversary
Image: SIPA USA/PA Images

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

Now, every evening, we bring you an evening longread to enjoy which will help you to escape the news cycle.

We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

Hong Kong Protests

For the past year, Hong Kong has been a battleground as protesters continue to fight back against the grip of the Chinese government. This is the story of the protests and the protesters who are taking a stand.

(The Guardian, approx. 28 minute reading time)

 “We don’t have any choice but to fight. We have to try to do something,” said 25-year-old Kelvin Chan, sitting alone near the waterfront of Victoria Harbour as dusk fell. It was a Sunday in early August, nine weeks into the protests. Chan, in a loose black T-shirt and a facemask that barely covered his face, did not look ready to fight, but said he was “waiting for the battle” that would inevitably take place once the police arrived. Protesters nearby made a barricade outside the Intercontinental Hotel as curious guests watched from the stairs. Like many of his generation, Chan believed that soon he would no longer have the chance to attend protests like these. “In the future, 2047 or earlier, I think China will brainwash Hong Kong people. China wants to control Hong Kong,” he said.

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