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Trafficking

New report on human trafficking highlights low number of prosecutions

The Immigrant Council of Ireland said this shows a “clear need for a fresh approach to identifying victims”.

A NEW REPORT by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) on trafficking has highlighted the low number of prosecutions in Ireland.

The report, by the OSCE’s Special Representative for Combating Trafficking in Human Being said it is concerned that Irish law does not extend full rights to over half of all victims, as they are also treated as asylum seekers.

Today the Immigrant Council of Ireland warned that this denial could prevent victims from rebuilding their lives by preventing access to training and work.

Denise Charlton, Chief Executive, said the report is a “wake up call” and with just 4 prosecutions in 2011 and 8 presently before the courts, “shows a clear need for a fresh approach to identifying victims”.

The report found that up to 60 per cent of trafficking victims are being denied full entitlements and benefits as they are treated solely as asylum seekers.

It also made recommendations about ensuring that the “best interests of the child are the primary consideration in all actions concerning every child”.

“The need for special training for social workers to meet the needs of child victims is also drawn attention to,” Charlton said. “It is clear from the report that those behind this trade will stop at nothing in their ruthless pursuit of money by trampling on the rights of others. The OSCE has shown us that our laws and regulations must be kept under constant review.”

Read: ‘Modern day slavery’ to be criminalised>
Read: Three arrested in human trafficking investigation>

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