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'Race against water' as rain threatens Thai boys in the cave

Water is being pumped out from the deluged cave round-the-clock.

Trapped young footballers are seen in the cave in Chiang Rai.
Trapped young footballers are seen in the cave in Chiang Rai.
Image: Xinhua News Agency/PA Images

THAI RESCUERS SAID they may be prodded into a complex extraction of 12 boys and their football coach from a flooded cave if forecast rains hammer the mountainside and jeopardise the rescue mission.

13 sets of diving equipment have been prepared for the team, who have endured 12 nights underground in the Tham Luang cave complex in northern Thailand.

Water is being pumped out from the deluged cave round-the-clock, reducing the flooding by one centimetre an hour.

But with rain forecast to begin tomorrow, the Chaing Rai provincial governor helming the unprecedented rescue effort conceded the mission was now “a race against the water”.

“Our biggest concern is the weather. We are calculating how much time we have if it rains, how many hours and days,” Narongsak Osottanakorn told reporters, without providing further details.

In a sign of increased urgency, Narongsak said medics and Thai navy SEAL divers are assessing whether the boys are fit and well enough to be taken out early — apparently softening his instance that “no risk” will be taken with the evacuation.

The prospect of the stranded team diving out is fraught with risk.

It takes seasoned cave diving experts around six hours to reach the muddy ledge where the boys are sheltering.

Many of the youngsters – who are aged between 11-16 – are unable to swim and none have diving experience.

Thai navy SEAL experts are teaching them the basics of diving.

But the areas where diving is still necessary are tight and may require the boys to swim through murky waters unaccompanied.

In a two-pronged strategy, cavers are also hunting for a chimney down to the boys, creating a potential second option for evacuation in the event heavy rains force their hand.

Authorities still hope they can manage any fresh deluge, with high-powered pumps draining 128 million litres of water so far from the cave in a round-the-clock effort.

“We are draining as much as we can,” said Khao Khieupakdi a a Bangkok disaster prevention official, seconded to northern Thailand like scores of other specialists.

© – AFP, 2018

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